Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Quesnel Council cleans house

Courtesy of the City of Quesnel:

Quesnel Council has repealed 34 outdated bylaws and a number of policies as an initial step in its comprehensive review of all of the City’s bylaws and policies.

“Updating the City’s bylaws and policies to ensure they are current and reflect today’s laws and best practices is a strategic objective for Council,” said Councillor Ron Paull, Chair of Council’s Policy and Bylaw Committee (PABCOM). “This house cleaning reflects Council’s intent to modernize our decision-making processes and ensure we can effectively manage our way through this economic transition.”

Along with repealing outdated bylaws, PABCOM is reviewing all of the City’s remaining bylaws and policies to ensure they are up-to-date, consistent with Council’s strategic plan and budget, and they reflect best practices. For example, based on a PABCOM recommendation, Council repealed a policy that gave it discretionary spending authority over an account called “Council Projects” as this account was removed from the 2015 budget. Council’s Finance Committee now reviews all spending requests and makes recommendations to Council before any financial decisions are made.

“During its budget process Council reduced its total travel budget by 34%, so we recommended that Council reduce itsper diem from $95/day to $50/day when an overnight stay is not required,” said Councillor Brisco, a member of PABCOM. “This change reflects our desire to be fiscally prudent and it will also stretch our limited training and travel dollars further.”

Mayor Bob Simpson said he was very pleased with the progress that Council’s new standing committees have made in such a short period of time: “Our Finance Committee recommended a budget that puts the City on the path of financial sustainability and now our Policy and Bylaw Committee is making significant progress toward updating our legislative tools so we will have modern governance tools to help us achieve our strategic goals. I appreciate the many hours of hard work Councillors are putting into our new Committee structure.”

Monday, March 2, 2015

2017 BC Election Head Start?

Earlier today - a Twitter follower appeared in my Twitter feeds called BC NDP - HUH?

This new Twitter user also produced a quick 1 min YouTube video critical of the BC NDP on their stance on LNG.  Watch below:



On a related matter - Gary Mason of the Globe and Mail also said on a possible NDP win in 2017:

Even without a single agreement for an LNG terminal, the Liberals look to be difficult to unseat in 2017 as things stand now

Read Mr. Mason's full column here

While it is too soon to make firm predications of the BC Liberals' chances of re-election in 2017, it will be most interesting to see how each political party (BC Liberals, NDP, Greens, Conservatives) will campaign in 2017 and how that will play out in the final determination of the 41st Parliament of BC but I do agree with Mr. Mason in that the BC Liberals chances of being defeated are remote while the BC NDP have internal problems to resolve before 2017 while it'll be interesting to see what type of campaign the BC Conservatives/BC Greens decide to launch in the 2017 Election

~SF

New BC Early Years Centre launched in Williams Lake

Courtesy of the BC Government Caucus:

Parents of young children in the Cariboo region will soon have access to a range of early learning, health and family services in one convenient location. A new virtual Early Years Centre, which will support families with children aged 0-6, is under development in Williams Lake. The virtual Early Years Centre will be supported by hotspots, or Links, in the community, which feature staff trained to assist individuals in accessing the virtual Early Years Centre, and understanding the website content. 

The virtual Early Years Centre will be fully operational in February 2016. Hosted by the Women’s Contact Society, the virtual centres, supported by Link location staff, offer a number of programs, services and supports including:

·         Information on local children’s programs, including Strong Start program locations and hours, Story and Rhyme groups, and play groups
·         Links to local hearing clinics and speech support for children
·         Contacts for the Williams Lake Child Development Centre, Williams Lake Child Care Resource and Referral, the Cariboo Friendship Society, and Three Corners Health Services

The virtual Early Years Centre will provide a valuable resource for families in the Cariboo region,” said Cariboo-Chilcotin MLA Donna Barnett. “The website features locally-oriented information in an easy-to-navigate format, and will help families access to all of the supports available to them, ensuring children have the best start possible.”

The virtual Early Years Centre is one of 14 new centres across the province. The chosen sites are in a diverse mix of urban, rural and Aboriginal communities, and will build on existing local community resources to enhance services for families. Each centre will receive $52,000 from the Provincial Office for the Early Years for this fiscal year as part of a $5.5-million investment over three years.

“The community Links and virtual Early Years Centre for the Cariboo region is an important resource for families,” says Cariboo North MLA Coralee Oakes. “Bringing together information in one easy-to-access location, and providing in-person support for parents accessing that information, will give children the best possible start as they move through their early years.”

This is the second phase of an initiative under the B.C. Early Years Strategy to implement a network of Early Years Centres throughout the province that will provide families with one-stop, convenient access to a range of services and supports, information and referrals.

“All the child serving agencies in Williams Lake have a long history of working together to meet the needs of all families,” said Women’s Contact Society EY Centre representative Irene Willsie. “We are very excited about the new virtual Early Years Centre which will use the latest technology to bring dynamic up to date resources to parents and child care providers.”

Facts on Wildlife Allocation

By Hon. Steve Thomson - Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations

After more than 10 years of review and negotiations, it's time to put the issue of wildlife-harvest allocation behind us and have some certainty.

At the end of the day, all stakeholders want the same thing -healthy wildlife populations that can be sustainably used by all groups.

Obviously the issue is contentious, with a middle ground that was hard to find. If it weren't, it wouldn't have taken a marathon 18 months of intensive negotiations to determine how to allocate the 7,500 big-game animals affected by allocation. Under the decision, an estimated 60 total animals have been moved to guide-outfitter hunts. Regardless of this decision, resident hunters will continue to harvest about 92% of the approximately 48,000 big game animals taken annually by hunters.

Many popular big-game species are not affected at all, including mule deer, white-tailed deer, most Rocky Mountain elk populations and black bear. This is because allocation is required only for species in areas that cannot be managed solely by general open season and only in the parts of British Columbia covered by guiding territories.

Hunting and fishing are key parts of many British Columbian families' lives and I am committed to keeping it this way. In fact, the increase in resident hunters from 82,000 10 years ago to over 102,000 today is in part because of resident hunter recruitment and retention strategies introduced and implemented by our government.

The decision on wildlife-harvest allocation also reflects this commitment. Under the decision, resident hunters continue to be recognized as having priority over non-resident hunters. Resident hunters make an important contribution toward the economy in this province by pursuing their passion for hunting and fishing, and it is anticipated this will continue. They also make large and ongoing contributions to wildlife stewardship.

The guide-outfitter industry also plays a valuable role, encouraging tourism and providing income for British Columbia residents and families. Out-of-province guide-outfitter clients are some of the highest-spending tourists per capita in British Columbia. I am also committed to maintaining the viability of the guide-outfitter industry, and to do that this allocation decision was required.

That said, I am sensitive to concerns of resident hunters. It was for this reason that I revisited my December 2014 determination and found strategic ways to reduce the transfer of animals from 110 down to 60.

Guide outfitters were not happy about this shift, but I felt it was important to balance the priority of resident harvest with the need of business certainty for guides.

Government's intent is for a consistent and transparent policy that is fair to all wildlife user groups, where conservation comes first, First Nations' needs are met, and resident hunters receive priority
allocation. The harvest allocation decision meets this intent, and will ensure that the $350 million that hunting brings to the B.C. economy (from both guides and residents) continues to be viable for years to come.

Now that a decision is made, I am hopeful that resident hunters and the guide-outfitter community can work together with government in support of these goals, which are supported by all hunters.

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Steve's Meeting Calendar/Expenses - Feb 2015

During the month of Feb 2015 -- as the CRD Area 'D' Director, I attended the following meetings:

* Feb 4-6: Attend Local Gov't Leadership Academy (LGLA) training in Prince George, BC
* Feb 14: Fun Day at McLeese Lake Community Hall site
* Feb 18: CRD/CCRHD Board of Directors' Meetings
* Feb 25: CC Rural Caucus/Joint Committee Meetings'
* Feb 26: Taseko Mines Presentation at Gibraltar Mines

As for expenses submitted during the month of Feb 2015:

* LGLA Mileage from WL-PG and return -- $243.36
* LGLA Travel Time from WL-PG and return - $93.60
* LGLA Daily Attendance Fees - $315.00
* Feb 18th CRD Board Mtg: $185.00
* Feb 25th CC Rural Caucus $70.00 (not yet approved)
* Feb 25th CC Joint Committee $70.00 (not yet approved)

~SF

Saturday, February 28, 2015

WL Mayor Walt Cobb: Re-Start Mt Polley Now!

At the Cariboo Regional District Board (CRD) meeting on Friday, March 6th, 2015 - Williams Lake Mayor (and CRD Director - Williams Lake) Walt Cobb will present a letter he authored on Monday, Feb 23rd to MLA Donna Barnett pleading with her to have the BC Government authorize a re-start of Mt Polley at 50% capacity.

I have discussed this with Mayor Cobb and he will request the CRD Board to do the same.  The Board has previously discussed this and did not agree at its' Dec 12, 2014 meeting to write a letter to Victoria calling on it to authorize a partial re-start of Mt Polley, at the urging of CRD Area 'F' Director Joan Sorley.

I have asked Xat'sull First Nations Chief Bev Sellars for her input on Mayor Cobb's letter, given she and her Band members' are Area 'D' constituents and I hope to hear from her before Friday's CRD Board meeting.  I have also heard from 1 Likely resident who says the Board should reject the request from Mayor Cobb.

It should make for an interesting conversation at the Board table, given what has transpired at Mt Polley and in the region and province from Dec 12th, 2014 until today

If you wish to contact myself in regards to Mayor Cobb's request, I would be pleased to hear from you.  Click here for my CRD Email address

Letter from Williams Lake Mayor Walt Cobb to Cariboo-Chilcotin (BC Liberal) MLA Donna Barnett:



Friday, February 27, 2015

Local Govt Mtgs - Wk of March 2-6

Local governments of the Cariboo-Chilcotin will be holding meetings' next week as follows:

Quesnel - Committee of the Whole meeting on Monday, March 2nd at 7pm in Quesnel Council Chambers.  On the Agenda:

* Visitor's Information Centre 2014 Year End Report
* Quesnel Community and Economic Development Corporation 2015 Budget
* Green Spaces, Parks and Recreation Master Plan
* Report from Policy Committee - Lebourdais Park Use/Prospector Car Club 20th Annual Show and Shine

View the full Agenda here

On Tuesday, March 3rd at 7pm in Quesnel Council Chambers - Public Open House on the Green Spaces, Parks and Recreation Master Plan

There is also a Special Regular Meeting of Council on Wednesday, March 4th at 9:00am, also in Quesnel Council Chambers.  On the Agenda:

* Update on Quesnel Works: Capital Reinvestment Program - Program Update and 20 Year Capital Plan
* Well Field Environmental Assessment Project

View the full Agenda here

Cariboo Regional District:

Thursday, March 5th at 1pm in CRD Boardroom - Finance Committee Meeting, chaired by Director M. Wagner.  On the Agenda:

* Review of Business and Financial Plans for 2015
* Review Capital Reserves
* Review Staff Report for Webcasting Board Meetings

View the full Agenda here

Friday, March 6th at 9:30am in the CRD Boardroom - CCRHD Board Meeting.  On the Agenda:

* Hospital Consent Calendar
* Urology Services in South Cariboo
* Mental Health Services - Gaps Report

View the full Agenda here

Friday, March 6th at 9:45am in the CRD Boardroom - CRD Board Meeting.  On the Agenda:

* Various Planning Matters
* Delegation - Orange Shirt Day presentation from Phyllis Webstad (Area D Alternate Director) and Jerome Beauchamp of SD #27

* Appt to NCLGA Board (Director J. Sorley)
* Consent Calendar
* Various Committee or Commission minutes/recommendations
* Area 'C' Director John Massier to report on recent meeting of the Fraser Basin Council Board of Directors'

* Request from Director Massier re: Letter of Support for West Chilcotin Healthcare Society
* Appt of Area "I" Advisory Planning Commission members
* Request from Director Richmond for Electoral Area Discretionary Funds – Electoral Areas G, H, and L for Playoff Towels (100 Mile Wranglers)

* Request from Director Cobb - Discussion of Letter from Mayor of Williams Lake regarding Reopening Plan for Mount Polley Mine

There is also an In-Camera meeting to be held under Section 90(1b - Municipal Honour) of the Community Charter

View the full Agenda here

Also - for this interested - there is a concert at the McLeese Lake Hall at 7pm Wednesday, March 4th.  Tickets can be picked up at McLeese Lake General Store for $10 or $12 at the door



Author Bruce Fraser tours CRD Area Branch Libraries

Courtesy of the CRD Library Network:

The Cariboo Regional District Library announced today that author Bruce Fraser will be visiting the 100 Mile House, Williams Lake and Quesnel Branches in support of his new novel, The Jade Frog: A Chilcotin Mystery, published by Granville Island Publishing in Dec., 2014. This is the second novel in Bruce Fraser’s Chilcotin Mystery Trilogy, about love, honour, and revenge.

The first novel, On Potato Mountain (2010), is set in 1958, and begins when rancher, Brody Hanlon, is gunned down in his living room and his adopted son, Noah, is charged with his murder. In The Jade Frog, the search for Brody Hanlon’s killer continues. Relying on the secrets of the land, Noah embarks on a quest to find the killer.

Spanning decades and immense territory, Fraser’s writing captures the beauty and spiritual influence of the Cariboo Chilcotin. Ultimately, this series is not just a tale of love and mystery, but is also a story about an incredible land and its people.

Bruce Fraser will be giving a presentation of the book, followed by a question and answer session. Books will be available for purchase and signing.


100 Mile Branch Library
449 S. Birch Ave. 
250-395-2332
Wednesday, March 11
6:30 p.m.
Williams Lake Branch Library
Suite A, 180 North Third Ave.
250-392-3630
Thursday, March 12
6:30 p.m.
Quesnel Branch Library
101 - #410 Kinchant St. 
250-992-7912
Friday, March 13
2 p.m.


Further information is available by contacting your local CRD Library branch or online at cln.ca

Imperial Metals: Lay-offs/April 1st permit deadline are 'coincidence'

Steve Robertson from Imperial Metals tells the Williams Lake Tribune:


If the company (Imperial Metals) had the permit by April 1 to restart when they have completed the reconstruction then workers could nicely transition over into operations, but that's just a coincidence
More here

Imperial Metals wants April 1st Mt Polley Re-start

Bill Bennett told the Vancouver Sun that the BC Government will not be rushed into making a decision for a potential re-start of the Mt Polley mine, east of Williams Lake and Imperial Metals was informed of this at a meeting with reps from the BC Government this past Wed and that a possible April 1st deadline is premature until the issue of water management at Mt Polley is resolved

Read more here


Thursday, February 26, 2015

Civil Claim could make or break City's 2015 Budget

WL City Councillor Scott Nelson speaks to the Goat about the potential impact of the court case of DeGagne v City of Williams Lake on WL Council's desire for a 0% tax increase budget for 2015.

Nelson further notes it could be up to a full year before the City knowns the full Court ruling.  As of this writing, the Court ruling had not yet been publicly released

Read more here


Provincial Mountain Bike Tourism Symposium

Joint Release from the Cariboo Regional District/City of Williams Lake:

Williams Lake will have an incredible opportunity to showcase its trails as the city welcomes hundreds of mountain bikers and industry professionals from across British Columbia to the Provincial Mountain Bike Tourism Symposium this fall.

From Oct. 2nd to 4th, the city will host a diverse group of industry professionals including media, destination marketers, commercial operators, land managers, government and industry representatives, professional riders, and mountain bike advocates.

The City of Williams Lake and the Cariboo Regional District have a long history of supporting mountain biking, and recognize the positive economic impact mountain bike tourism has on our region. A partnership between local governments and the Cariboo Mountain Bike Consortium and the Williams Lake Cycling Club continues to develop mountain biking infrastructure and promotion in the Cariboo.

This partnership, coupled with world class single track, a dedicated local riding community, continued trail maintenance, and a strong relationship with Recreation Sites and Trails BC, helped create the winning bid to host the Provincial Mountain Bike Tourism Symposium in Williams Lake this fall. Eleven communities from throughout BC submitted proposals but unique Cariboo qualities helped Williams Lake win the bid.

Hosting this event will have multiple benefits to the community of Williams Lake and the Cariboo Region through heightened media attention, positive economic impact, and opportunity to showcase the continued hard work and support that has built Williams Lake into a world class mountain bike destination. In addition to the conference itself, the weekend will include guided rides, a social evening, and a film screening.

Mayor Walt Cobb is pleased to have Williams Lake host this event and recognizes the benefits. “Having this group in Williams Lake will not only impact our economy during the symposium, but it will increase tourism and influence the economy in the seasons to come,” he says.

“Our regional effort to support and promote mountain biking has given the Cariboo a presence on both a provincial and international stage, and the heightened media attention will keep us there,” says Al Richmond, Cariboo Regional District Chair and Area G Director.

The Cariboo Mountain Bike Consortium and the Williams Lake Cycling Club are pleased to have their hard work recognized and have agreed to become sponsor of this event through in kind and cash donation.

"The Cariboo Mountain Bike Consortium has always been about creating partnerships and fostering economic growth,” says Cariboo Mountain Bike Consortium President Thomas Schoen.

“We are thrilled to be a sponsor of this exciting event that will showcase our partnerships with the City of Williams Lake, the Cariboo Regional District, the Williams Lake Cycling Club, the Williams Lake Indian Band and of course the conference host, the Western Canada Mountain Bike Tourism Association. There is a need to present events in the Interior and in the North of BC and we are more than ready to showcase what the local cycling community has accomplished over the past years."

“The Williams Lake Cycling Club is pleased to have this opportunity to showcase the hard work and the thousands of hours that the local building and riding community have put into our trail network, says Williams Lake Cycling Club President Shawn Lewis. “Most communities have good trails, not many have a network with the diversity and scope that Williams Lake has to offer. Part of our mission statement is to promote mountain biking in Williams Lake as a beneficial economic activity for local businesses, and what better way is there to do that than to invite the Province to our community? We look forward to working with all the partners involved in putting on this MTBA Symposium and anticipate a successful and fun event. “

“We are incredibly fortunate to live in a province that is so well suited to mountain biking, we truly are the envy of the mountain biking world, says Western Canada Mountain Bike Tourism Association (MBTA) Executive Director Martin Littlejohn. “Williams Lake epitomizes the community spirit found in BC that supports mountain biking and we are proud to have it be the location for the symposium in 2015.

More information is available online at mtbtourismsymposium.ca. To become involved or to support this event, please contact Martin Littlejohn at 604-254-4266 or martin@mbta.ca.

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

CC Joint Committee Mtg - Feb 25th

Present from City of WL: Mayor W. Cobb (Co-Chair) and Councillors Nelson, Smith, Walters and Zacharias

Present from Cariboo RD:  Directors J. Sorley (Co-Chair), S. Forseth, B. Kemp; B. Anderson

Meeting chaired by Co-Chair Sorley

Staff:

Lori Schick - Deputy Corporate Officer, CRD
Geoff Paynton - Director of Community Services, City of WL
Darron Campbell - Mgr of Community Services, CRD
S. Miranda - Mgr of Active Living, City of WL

Meeting called to order at 5:00pm

Meeting Agenda approved
Mins of Jan 28th CCJC Meeting adopted

Delegation:

1) Dr. Graham Kelsey appeared before the Committee to brief new elected officials on the Central Cariboo Arts/Culture Society

A Question/Answer period ensued

Co-Chair Sorley, on behalf of the Committee, thanked Dr. Kelsey for his time/information

Business:

1) CCACS 2014 Grant Results Report

Discussion ensued thereon

Resolved - Report received

2) CMRC Statutory Holiday Report

The Director of Community Services reviewed the item with the Committee
Discussion ensued thereon

Resolved - Report received

Director S. Forseth and Councillor C. Smith declared conflicts of interest on the next item (Letter from Mark Snowball - Pres of WL Powder Kings Snowmobile Club regarding request for a Joint City/CRD Grant for Assistance) and left the meeting at 5:38pm

Director S. Forseth and Councillor C. Smith returned to the meeting at 5:41pm

3) Pool Upgrade Project - Working Group Meeting Notes – February 11

The Mgr of Community Services reviewed the item with the Committee
Discussion ensued thereon

Resolved - Item received

4) Discussion Item - Grant for Assistance Program - Form Sub-Committee (Director J. Sorley)

Resolved - That a sub-Committee of Director S. Forseth and City Councillor L. Walters and CRD/City of WL CFO's be established to review the Grant for Assistance Agreement/Policy and report back to Joint Committee

5) Action Page

Resolved - Receive and remove Items 4,5,6 and 8 from the Action Page

Meeting adjourned at 6:25pm

CC Rural Caucus Mtg - Feb 25th

Present - Chair S. Forseth; Director B. Kemp, J. Sorley and B. Anderson

Staff:

L. Schick - Deputy Corporate Officer
T. Grady - Supervisor of Solid Waste Management
M.Minchau - Mgr of Environmental Services

Meeting called to order at 3:30pm

Meeting Agenda approved
Mins of Jan 28th CCRC Mtg adopted

Business:

1) Ltr from Wildwood PAC re: Funding Request

The Chair reviewed the letter with the Committee
Discussion ensued thereon

Resolved - That the letter be received

2) Tipping Fee Changes at the Central Cariboo Transfer Station

The Supervisor of Solid Waste Management reviewed this item with the Committee
Discussion ensued thereon

Resolved - Item received and refer to March 25th CC Joint Committee meeting for consideration

3) Action Page

Resolved - Item received

Meeting adjourned at 4:38pm

New 100 Mile Elementary

Courtesy of School District #27 (Cariboo-Chilcotin):

At the closed meeting of the Board of Education on 24 February 2015, the Board of Education passed motions that will support the Board’s intention to replace 100 Mile House Elementary School.

Chair Tanya Guenther advises, “The Board of Education unanimously agreed to officially request approval from the Ministry of Education to provide a new elementary school for 100 Mile House. The Board has had the replacement of 100 Mile House Elementary School on its Five Year Capital Plan for over ten years [2001]. It’s time we move forward.”

The Board also passed a motion that, when approved by the Minister, the new build of the school will be located on the now closed 100 Mile Jr. Secondary School site. The Board will be writing to Minister Fassbender and extending an invitation for him to visit the Cariboo-Chilcotin and to advocate for the new 100 Mile House Elementary School.

Background Information:  LINK:  Executive Summary 2014-09-26 of the Project Identification Report

No School Closures for 2015-16 SD27 Budget

Courtesy of the Board of Education - SD #27 (Cariboo-Chilcotin):

At the closed meeting of the Board of Education on 24 February 2015, the Board of Education unanimously passed a motion that it will NOT be considering the closure of schools to assist in the balancing the 2015-2016 School District Budget.

The Board of Education is in the process of preparing its 2015-2016 Budget and is seeking input from stakeholder groups and the public.

The District’s funding for the 2015-2016 school year will be reduced by 1.5% which amounts to approximately $800,000.

The Ministry of Education provided funding protection to those school districts who were facing significant declines in enrolment. Student enrolment is the basis for which the Ministry funds school boards.

The impact on SD27 is that the Ministry has funded the District above what the enrolment would generate for the 2014-2015 school year by $3.3 million. The Ministry has also implemented (in the 2013-2014 school year) a means to reduce funding protection for school districts affected by reducing funding to those school districts in the amount 1.5% per year.

For SD27, this means that in 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 school years, funding was reduced by $800,000 per year. It is anticipated that the Board will need to systemically reduce its budget by approximately $800,000 per year (1.5%) for the next 4 or more years (depending on enrolment stabilization) to eliminate the funding protection.

Board Chair Tanya Guenther states, “Over the past two years, the Board has met this challenge by reducing departmental budgets, closing schools and programs and reducing staff. Again, this next school year [2015-2016] the Board is charged with reducing its budget by another 1.5% which equates to approximately $800,000.” She continued, “The Board will continue to focus its efforts on budget reductions that have little or no impact on students.”

To have your say, log onto the District’s website www.sd27.bc.ca and follow the link to complete the survey. The survey will close at 4:00 pm on 06 March 2015

WL Timber Supply Area reduced...

From Williams Lake Tribune website:

The allowable annual cut for the Williams Lake Timber Supply Area has been reduced from 5.77 million cubic metres to three million cubic metres, chief forester Dave Peterson announced today.
The changes are effective immediately.
"By focusing on salvaging dead and dying pine while it still has economic value, I am confident we can maintain the mid-term timber supply while contributing to local economies," Peterson said.
In 2003, the AAC for the timber supply area was about 3.77 million cubic metres. It was temporarily increased in 2007 to 5.77 million cubic metres to recover maximum economic value and speed regeneration of forests impacted by the mountain pine beetle epidemic.
The new AAC limits the volume of live trees for harvest to 1.5 million cubic metres — which is close to the level that can be sustained through the mid-term once the beetle salvage is completed.
In the Williams Lake Timber Supply Area, it is estimated the mountain pine beetle infestation peaked in 2005/06 and now the cut level can decrease again to ensure the cut is sustainable in the long term.
As well, since 2007, the land available for harvesting has decreased due to the creation of new old growth management areas, and the removal of the Tsilhqot'in title area from the timber harvesting land base.
On June 26, 2014, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled 141,769 hectares of land belonged to the Tsilhqot'in and, as such, could no longer be considered as provincial Crown land.
There are four lumber mills, one veneer/plywood plant, two log home manufacturers, a pellet mill and a remanufacturing plant in the Williams Lake Timber Supply Area. In addition, a wood waste-fuelled electric generation plant consumes wood waste from local sawmills to generate electricity for sale to BC Hydro.
The Williams Lake Timber Supply Area covers approximately 4.93 million hectares, with 1.83 million hectares available for timber harvesting.
The timber supply area includes the city of Williams Lake and the smaller communities of Horsefly, Likely, Miocene, Alexis Creek, Anahim Lake, Tatla Lake, Riske Creek, Big Creek and Nimpo Lake

Quesnel Green Spaces, Parks and Recreation Master Plan

Courtesy of the City of Quesnel website:

The questionnaire is now available here! Also available is a  parks map for your reference when completing the questionnaire. Hard copies are available at Quesnel City Hall - 410 Kinchant Street.
Quesnel is moving forward on their initiation of a Green Spaces, Parks and Open Space Recreation Master Plan. The Plan will inventory and classify the City’s existing park land, guide policy development and decision making towards a sustainable city-wide vision for parks and open space recreation, and develop a strategic direction for Green Space, Parks and Open Space Recreation for the next 10 years to move us towards that vision. 
The community and stakeholder groups will play a vital role in the Plan's development and we welcome your input and participation in this process! 
A public open house is planned for Tuesday, March 3rd at 7:00 p.m. in Quesnel Council Chambers.
Updates on this process will be posted at the OurQuesnel site which you can go to here

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

WL Council Highlights - Feb 24th mtg

Present - Mayor Cobb; Councillors Nelson, Smith, Walters and Zacharias

Staff:

D. Garceau - City Manager
C. Bouchard - Mgr of Legislative Services
M. Stewart - Director of Finance
C. Hutton - Planner
B. Foote - Senior Bylaw Officer

Meeting called to order at 6pm

Meeting Agenda approved with late items and minutes of the Feb 10th, 2015 WL City Council meeting being adopted

Delegation:

1) Bob Gibney and Shelley Thompson from Fortis BC appeared before Council to discuss upcoming Fortis BC Projects in Williams Lake Area

A Question/Answer period ensued

Mayor Cobb, on behalf of Council, thanked Ms. Thompson and Mr. Gibney for their time/information

Business:

1) Council received for information the accounts payable computer cheque listings for the periods ending February 12 and 19, 2015

2) Council gave 1st Reading to OCP/Zoning Amendment Bylaws No. 2229 & 2230 (18 Woodland Drive) and directed a Public Information Meeting be held on March 11th at 7pm in WL Council Chambers

3) Council gave 1st/2nd Reading to Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 2226 (Metal Shipping Containers - Regulations amendment) and a Public Hearing was set for March 24 at 7:00 PM in Council Chambers

4) Council ratified 3 Email Polls to confirm the following:

a) Proclaim the week of February 15 to 22, 2015 as "Guide/Scout Week" in the City of Williams Lake

b) Authorize submission of a revised application to the New Building Canada Fund - Small Communities Fund (NBCF-SCF) program for the River Valley Sewer Trunk Upgrades project for an updated total value of $4.2 million, from $3.2 million, with the City's share of approximately $1,400,000 to come from sewer reserves

c) Authorize early budget approval for the purchase of an asphalt recycler up to the amount of $65,000

5) Council adopted two Joint Committee recommendations as follows:

a) That Central Cariboo / City of Williams Lake Joint Committee Report #7-2015, together with the report of the Events and Marking Coordinator dated January 19, 2015 regarding the BC Mountain Bike Tourism Association 2015 Symposium, be received and the recommendation that the Central Cariboo Recreation budget be amended to include a contribution of up to $4,000 for the event be endorsed

b) That pursuant to Central Cariboo / City of Williams Lake Joint Committee Report #8-2015, the agenda item summary of Darron Campbell, Manager of Community Services, Cariboo Regional District dated January 23, 2015 regarding the Sam Ketcham Pool Project Working Group meeting notes of January 22, 2015 be received for information.

6) Council encouraged the community to participate in this year's Nutrition Run - Sunday, April 12th at the Cariboo Memorial Recreation Complex

7) Council adopted Smoke-Free Bylaw #2227, 2015

8) Council agreed to provide a letter of support for the Nuxalk Nation bid application to host the Junior All-Native 2016 Basketball Tournament in the City of Williams Lake during Spring Break of March 2016.

9) Council received a letter from the Cariboo Regional District regarding the nomination period for appointments of Regional District representatives to the NCLGA Executive Board

10) Council received the minutes of the Jan 28th Central Cariboo/City of Williams Lake Joint Committee meeting

11) Council received a letter from the BC Aboriginal Network on Disability Society dated February 6, 2015 requesting a donation in the amount of $200 towards their BC Without Barriers campaign

12) Council proclaimed the following:

a) "National Public Works Week" - week of May 17 to 23, 2015
b) "Daffadil Month" - April 2015

13) Late Item - Council agreed to endorse submission of a joint (Cariboo RD, Cities of Quesnel/WL & Districts of Wells and 100 Mile House) NCLGA Resolution titled "Support for Forest Industry" as follows:

SUPPORT FOR FOREST INDUSTRY

WHEREAS the forest industry continues to be an economic mainstays of the province, providing stable employment for tens of thousands of families, and contributing $12.4 billion to provincial GDP and $2.5 billion in taxes and fees to the three levels of government;

AND WHEREAS the competitive advantage of the British Columbia forest industry has been eroded by cumulative impacts including timber supply declines, uncertainty on the land base, and delays in provincial market pricing processes;

AND WHEREAS these cumulative impacts threaten the economic well-being of communities throughout British Columbia;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the NCLGA call upon the Province to deliver the full allowable cut under the BC Timber Sales program, complete a
science-based inventory of the available timber supply, and move assertively to increase operating certainty on the working forest land base.

14) Late Item #2 - Council received the following In-Camera reports for information:

a) In-Camera Report #1/15 - Change CC Ec Dev Corporation Board Directors from 8 to 10

b) In-Camera Report #2/15 - Old CC Ec Dev Corporation Board Directors' Removal

c) In-Camera Report #3/15 - Appoint new CC Ec Dev Corporation Board Directors as follows:

 Larry Stranberg, Dr. Doug Neufeld, John Dell, Sue Lachance, Paul French, Amy Thacker, Vic Sharman, Stephan Hoezier, Tyrel Lucas and Dave Walgren

15) Council received the "Council Information Package" as follows:

• February 6, 2015 - Ministry of Advanced Education re Aboriginal Post-Secondary Education and Training Policy Framework and Action Plan;
• February 18, 2015 - CRD Board Highlights;
• February 19, 2015 - Introduction from NDP Spokesperson for Rural and Northern Health;
• February 20, 2015 - Social Planning Council February 20, 2015 Community Update Newsletter.

Meeting recessed at 6:35pm

Public Hearing on Bylaw #2225 (664 Oliver St - Sandman Inn) at 7:00pm

Meeting resumed at 7:02pm

16) After a public hearing - Council gave 3rd Reading to Bylaw #2225 and referred it to the Ministry of Transportation for approval as per the Transportation Act

Meeting adjourned at 7:05pm

MLA Barnett on BC Budget 2015

Yesterday afternoon in the BC Legislature - Cariboo-Chilcotin MLA Donna Barnett said the following in regards to BC Budget 2015:

I'm pleased to rise today and have the opportunity to respond to the budget.

Our government supports economic development. Communities in the province, such as the Cariboo-Chilcotin, need to be safe and secure in order to succeed. Safety and security come through developing a strong economy. They say that the third time is the charm, and balancing our third consecutive budget in a row is not only charming, but it is a result of our government's continued hard work with a projected surplus of $879 million.

We are grateful for the opportunity that British Columbians gave us. We have listened. We have a plan, and we are delivering on the commitments that we made to the people of British Columbia. We did this with fiscal prudence and a strong vision.

Prudent fiscal management supports B.C.'s triple-A credit rating, which allows more taxpayer dollars to be spent on direct services rather than debt-servicing costs. Fiscal responsibility requires discipline. We are balancing the budget because that is the very heart of fiscal responsibility.

Because of our government's strong fiscal discipline, we're able to find room for modest investments that strengthen and encourage growth in key economic sectors, such as resource development.

We have leveraged the knowledge and skills of British Columbians and the strengths of our natural resources. With this budget, we are continuing to build on these advantages.

Our government is extending the mining flow-through tax credit for an additional year by developing our natural resources responsibly, working with industry and harnessing the power of the private sector.

Forestry has always been the backbone of the economy of the Cariboo and reflects the ecological and the cultural diversity of our province. Our diversified forest industry is so strong that our region has a reality show, Timber Kings. That shows the incredible skills and talents of those building magnificent log homes for buyers around the world that boosted the Williams Lake economy.

There are 51 community forests in B.C. that play an active role in the forest sector through harvesting and supplying logs for the market. In the Cariboo region we have community forests in 100-Mile House, Clinton, Iskut First Nation, Likely-Xatśūll, Tatla Lake and the city of Williams Lake and the Williams Lake Indian Band as partners, and in Wells-Barkerville.

There are also important and growing opportunities for employment and economic growth while enhancing the working relationships between communities and local First Nations. In the 100-Mile House we have West Fraser Sawmills, 100 Mile Lumber and Chasm Sawmills, Ainsworth–100-Mile House OSB plant, and a number of log home builders in the area also rely on timber from the timber supply area.

We also have four lumber mills: two Tolko industries, West Fraser Mills, West Chilcotin Forest Products, Tolko chip mill, Pinnacle Renewable Energy Group pellet mill, West Fraser plywood and veneer sawmills in a thriving softwood lumber industry.

The Northwest Energy cogeneration plant operating in Williams Lake since 1993 is the largest biomass plant in North America and sells energy to B.C. Hydro. It consumes 600,000 tonnes of wood waste to generate 66 watts of electricity.

We have a plan. We laid it out. Why does it matter? It matters because if we respect taxpayers, we can't simply assume that these costs will be dealt with by taxpayers alone. We need to responsibly develop resources in British Columbia so that we can give British Columbians the kinds of advantages that they expect and deserve.

As we continue to build and diversify our natural resource industries, we're making sure that First Nations are partners in advancing economic prosperity. We continue to make slow but steady progress on the treaty front. In the meantime, B.C. is the first province in Canada to share provincial revenue from mining, forestry and clean energy projects with First Nation communities.

We now have more than 200 revenue-sharing agreements in place, ensuring that First Nations benefit directly from the work taking place in their traditional territories.

We also have been tireless advocates for diversifying our markets, and thanks to those efforts, we have seen great success in China and hope to duplicate that success in India.

Forestry is another traditional mainstay of our rural communities. More than 40 percent of the province's regional economies is based on forestry activities through more than 6,600 businesses.

The NDP say they care about forestry, jobs and communities. Well, how did they deal with mitigating the pine beetle epidemic? Back in the '90s, local communities, industry, foresters, mayors said, "Let's go in and manage the beetles," even though they were in a class A park, but the NDP said no. The result? Devastation.

It was agreed to give Carrier Lumber about $75 million in cash and other benefits to compensate for timber rights improperly confiscated by the opposition in 1993. The settlement stems from a 1999 court ruling that found that the NDP government abused its authority by taking away cutting rights. The government then tried to cover this up, the court found, by failing to disclose more than 2,000 relevant documents. This is NDP forestry. Our government's initiative for responsible forestry is a step in the right direction to create long-lived wood products that store carbon for decades and even centuries.

As Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations for Rural Development, I will continue to be a voice for rural communities in our Legislature. As a resident of the beautiful Cariboo-Chilcotin, the interests of rural communities have always been important to me. Rural British Columbians are generous, hard-working people with a pioneer spirit. Whether they're ranchers, miners, teachers, doctors, they're independent and proud. It is the rural parts of British Columbia that give our province its unique character.

Employment in rural communities is one of the main benefits of community forests. According to the upcoming report by Natural Resources Canada, the industry average of jobs per metres cubed is 0.2 jobs for 1,000 metres cubed. These jobs are exclusively in forestry, logging and support services.

The mining industry is important to British Columbians. An average salary today in the mine industry is over $114,000 a year, up from $81,000 in 2001. We actually have approximately 20 percent of all the mineral exploration investment in Canada happening right here in British Columbia, in rural British Columbia. Extending for one year the B.C. mining flow-through share tax credit will provide have approximately 20 percent of all the mineral exploration investment in Canada happening right here in British Columbia, in rural British Columbia. Extending for one year the B.C. mining flow-through share tax credit will provide an incentive for mineral exploration.

In addition, a base budget increase of $6.3 million annually to the Minister of Mines and Energy to support continued improvements to permitting the regulatory oversight, including increased of mine inspections. Under the previous NDP government, mining was decimated in B.C. The mining workforce shrunk by 36 percent and mining executives ranked B.C. as the most antagonistic place in the world to invest in mining.

Our province has the most diverse agrifoods industry in Canada, providing approximately 60,000 jobs, generating roughly $11.6 billion a year for our province's economy. We are further committing to $2 million to our Buy Local program to help farmers and food processors promote their B.C. products.

Our health care system. More than 800,000 residents, or 20 percent of the province, do not pay MSP premiums because of premium assistance. When we help seniors, we help everybody. Over the past decade we have focused on expanding the range of care options available for seniors in order to meet this increased demand, while supporting healthy aging to improve the quality of life for all B.C. seniors, helping them remain independent for as long as possible.

Our government has reduced the rate of health funding increases to an annual average of under 3 percent from a high of nearly 8 percent in the mid-2000s.

The budget reaffirms the B.C. government's commitment to health care, with nearly a $3 billion increase to the Ministry of Health's spending over three years. Our province continues to have the best health care outcomes anywhere, including the longest life expectancy in Canada and the country's lowest mortality rates for cancer and heart disease. I am proud to say that B.C. ranks third in the world for health performance. In 2015 health care funding again is at a record level of $19.2 billion, more than double the amounts spent in 2000-2001.

When it comes to transportation, our government has invested $2.9 billion in transportation investments. With Highway 97, the Cariboo region is benefiting every day, as motorists are safer now and have more effective connections to work and home.

In the Cariboo region, four-laning three sections south of 100 Mile House has included 70 Mile North, starting north of Willow Road. That was completed in October 2013. Stormy Road North and Bullock Lake Road projects were also completed in October 2013.
Over the next three years construction will start on four-laning between Carson Drive and Fox Mountain in Williams Lake, as well as four-laning the south boundary of the Williams Lake Indian Reserve and Lexington Road. In addition on Highway 20 at Alexis Creek in the Chilcotin, and Anaheim Lake airport there was $4 million of resurfacing of approximately 11 kilometres, including extending the runway pavement at Anaheim airport that was completed in the fall of 2012.

On Highway 20, in the Chilcotin west of Riske Creek, there was also $3.5 million of resurfacing of approximately 12 kilometres that was completed in the fall of 2013. And there were four projects delivered along Highway 20 in 2014. We installed a dynamic messaging sign just west of Williams Lake on Highway 20 at a total cost of $340,000. The Ministry of Transportation provided $300,000 of that.

We brushed the highway corridor in the Tatla Lake area of the Chilcotin. We seal-coated 92.84 lane-kilometres between Tatla Lake and Puntzi Lake at a total expenditure of $1.89 million. We resurfaced and paved 39.2 lane-kilometres between Anahim IR and Lees Corner in the Chilcotin, investing $5.33 million. I'm proud of the work that has been done by the Ministry of Transportation on Highway 20 for the people of the Chilcotin, for their safety and for transportation and to create economic growth.

Our tourism sector in British Columbia employs more than 132,000 British Columbians — almost one in every 15 jobs in our province — and generates $13.9 billion in revenue. Our government believes that the tourism sector can continue to create jobs, opportunity and prosperity for British Columbians in every corner of the province.

In the Cariboo-Chilcotin freshwater fishing is one of the many attractions. With this budget we are delivering on our commitment to direct all revenues from freshwater fishing licences, approximately $10 million a year, to the Freshwater Fisheries Society for conservation activities. Freshwater sport fishing generates approximately $500 million a year in economic activity, much of that taking place in rural British Columbia and in the Cariboo-Chilcotin.

British Columbians expect their tax dollars to be used wisely and that every available education dollar is going to help children in the classroom, whether it is in K to 12 or post-secondary. We are engineering our education system and training so that B.C. students and workers have the skills to be first in line for jobs in a growing economy.

This budget delivers significant funding for education, up $576 million over three years. Total funding to school districts will top $5 billion next year. That's $1.2 billion more per year that goes towards school districts, such as school district 27 in the Cariboo-Chilcotin.

More than 70 percent of those jobs will require some form of post-secondary education, and 44 percent of those jobs will be skilled trades and technical occupations. As part of that plan, Budget 2015 extends the training tax credit, which benefits both employers and apprentices, to the end of 2017. We are also extending the enhanced credit, which provides an additional 50 percent for First Nations individuals, people with disabilities and their employees.

With this budget we are reaffirming our commitment to keep our province on the right track of expanded growth and opportunity, ensuring that British Columbia stays the best place to live, work and raise a family. The 2015 budget truly does reaffirm our commitment to keep our province on the right track of expanding growth, opportunity and prosperity in the most balanced way
.

Project Comeback Final Report released

Project Comeback - a collaborative project between Canada, British Columbia, Fraser Basin Council and the BC Rural Network - looked at the topic of how to retain young person in Rural BC at a time when we typically see young people leaving Rural BC for bigger opportunities in the urban parts of BC

More details on the program here

A number of communities participated in the program including:

Williams Lake
Smithers
Mt Waddington Regional District
Chase
Kaslo

Read the final report of Project Comeback here

Monday, February 23, 2015

2014 Local Election Disclosure Forms - Cariboo-Chilcotin Region

Today, Elections BC made available the disclosure forms for those who ran in the Nov 15th, 2014 local government elections.  Deadline to file with Elections BC was Feb 13th with the late filing fee of $500 deadline to file being Friday, March 16th..  Any candidate who hasn't filed after March 16th will be disqualified from running in the Oct 2018 local government election

The full list of disclosure forms for all local governments (Council, Regional Board, etc) can be viewed here

Some noteworthy items to report

In Quesnel -- Bob Simpson spent $7,327.35 to win his seat while Mary Sjostrom spent almost 2.5 times Mayor Simpson at $18,898.64.  The highest spending Councillor candidate was Ron Paull at $3,200 with the cheapest Councillor candidate Kyle Jones spending $3.90

In Williams Lake - Walt Cobb spent $8,063 to win his Mayor seat while former Mayor Kerry Cook spent $6,845 in her 3rd election bid and former City Councillor Surinderpal Rathor spent $18,225.11 in his Mayoral bid.  The highest spending Councillor candidate was Scott Nelson at $7,039.37 while the cheapest Councillor candidate Marnie Brenner spent $146.62.  Note -- John Bjornstrom has yet to file his 2014 local campaign finance forms with Elections BC.  If he does not by March 16th, 2015, he will be legally prevented from running in the Oct 2018 local government election

In 100 Mile House - Current Mayor Mitch Campsall spent $937.81 to keep his seat while his challenger, Maureen Pinkney, spent $974.49 in the 2014 election.  The highest spending Councillor candidate was Dave Mingo at $1,000 while a number of Councillor candidate spent no money including successful candidates Spence Henderson and Bill Hadden & unsuccessful candidates Rita Giesbrecht and John McCarvill

In Wells - a number of Councillor candidates spent no money to win their seats including successful Councillors' Richard Wright and Mandy Kilsby.  No formal election for Wells Mayor Robin Sharpe

In School District #28 (Quesnel) - the highest spending Trustee candidate was David Chapman at $1,350.13 while the cheapest Trustee candidate was Angela Mezzatesta who spent $317.59

In School District #27 (Cariboo-Chilcotin) -- there were only two elections in Zones 4 and 5.  In Zone 4 - successful Trustee candidate Christine Dyment spent nothing to win her seat while her opponent, Bev Goldstone, also spent no money.  While in Zone 5 -- successful Trustee candidate Dr. Sheila Boehm spent nothing to win her seat while her opponent, Deb Bischoff, also spent no money

Finally in the Cariboo Regional District -- Areas A, B, D, E, I and K held elections while Areas C, F, G, H, J and L held no elections

In Area A -- Ted Armstrong spent $1,500.19 to keep his seat while his opponents Cory Delves spent $978.45 and Susan McNeill spent $756.00

In Area B -- Jerry Bruce spent $164.98 to win his seat while former Area B Director Heloise Dixon-Warren spent $365.94

In Area D -- Steve Forseth spent $323.71 to win his seat while Pennie Daffurn spent $750.00 and Blaine Wiggins spent $290.59

In Area E -- Byron Kemp spent no money to keep his seat while his opponent, Phyllis Webstad, spent $72.85

In Area I -- Dylan Cash spent $900 to win his seat while former Area I Director Jim Glassford spent $830.84

In Area K -- Betty Anderson spent $397.08 to win her seat while her opponents Geraldine Charleyboy and Melynda Neufeld spending no money in their campaigns...





Mt Polley Community Mtg - Horsefly - Feb 23rd



Friday, February 20, 2015

Local Gov't Mtgs - Wk of Feb 23-27

A number of local governments in the Cariboo-Chilcotin are meeting next week as follows:

Quesnel - Regular Council/Committee of the Whole + Public Budget Input on Mon, Feb 23rd at 7pm in Quesnel Council Chambers (2nd Floor - 410 Kinchant St).  On the Agenda:

* Public Input - 2015 Budget
* Presentations from local BIA's (3)
* Adopt Various Committees' Recommendations
* Parking on Reid St - Councillor J. Brisco to report
* 2 NCLGA Resolutions for approval - ICBC Windshield Claim + Withdrawal of Candidate
* Community Energy and Emissions Plan
* Master Parks' Plan
* Omnibus Repeal Bylaw
* Barkerville Brewery Co. Brewery Lounge Application
* Business Improvement Areas 2015 Commercial Tax

Full Agenda is here

Williams Lake - Regular Council Meeting on Tuesday, Feb 24th at 6pm in Williams Lake Council Chambers (450 Mart St).  On the Agenda:

* Delegation: FortisBC on projects in Williams Lake area
* Creation of 7 New Single Family Residential Lots - 18 Woodland Drive
* Regulating Metal Shipping Containers
* Ratify 2 Email Polls of Council: Asphalt Recycler Machine + River Valley Trunk Sewer Upgrades - Grant Amount Amendment
* Adopt Smoke Free Bylaw

View the full Agenda here

There is also a Public Hearing at 7pm same night for Zoning Amendment Bylaw #2225 to clarify the existing use at 664 Oliver St (Sandman Inn)

View that Agenda here

School District #27 (Cariboo-Chilcotin) - Regular Board of Education meeting on Tuesday, Feb 24th at 6:30pm in SD27 Boardroom (350 2nd Ave).  On the Agenda:

* Delegations - Lake City Secondary Stand-Up Team & Orange Shirt Day (Director J. Sorley and J. Beauchamp)

* Consent Calendar
* Community Use of Facilities - Process to Adopt Policy
* Adopt 2014-2015 Amended Annual Budget Bylaw
* Review School District Logo
* Outdoor Education Report
* Trustee Election Report

View the full Agenda here

100 Mile House - Regular Council Meeting on Tuesday, Feb 24th at 7pm in 100 Mile Council Chambers (385 Birch Ave).  On the Agenda:

* NCLGA Resolution - Competitive of Forest Industry
* Highway Rescue Services
* Demonstration Forest - funding applications to NDIT

View the full Agenda here

Cariboo Regional District: Meetings next week on Wednesday, Feb 25th as follows:

CC Rural Caucus at 3pm in the CRD Committee Rm (180D North 3rd Avenue) -- On the Agenda:

* Funding Request from Wildwood Elementary PAC
* Tipping Fees at Central Cariboo Transfer Station
* Action Page

View the Agenda here

CC Joint Committee at 5pm in the CRD Boardroom (180D North 3rd Avenue) -- On the Agenda:

* Delegation - Dr. G. Kelsey on behalf of the CC Arts/Culture Society to brief new Committee members on the CC Arts/Culture Society

* Update on Sam Ketchum Pool Working Group activities
* CC Arts/Culture Society 2014 Project Grant Final Report
* 2014 Stat Holiday Report for Cariboo Memorial Recreation Complex
* Funding Request - Williams Lake Powder Kings Snowmobile Club
* Discussion Item: Reestablishment of Joint Grants for Assistance Process - Appointment of
Subcommittee

* Action Page

View the full Agenda here

For those in Quesnel - the funeral for former Quesnel City Councillor Peter Couldwell will be held on Saturday, Feb 21st at 1pm - Quesnel Seniors' Centre (461 Carson Ave)


Over-regulation killing Community Halls?

CBC Daybreak North interviews Aaron Krafcyzk - President of the Montney Community Association in Northeast BC.  He suggests that provincial over-regulation is leading, in part, to the decline of community halls in Rural BC, in addition to changes in society - in general

He asks the question:

"Do we need protection from Grandma's stew?"

The Peace River Regional District has received a report on the subject of the status of Community Halls and Recreation assets within the North Peace region. Read here

Listen to the interview below:



Thursday, February 19, 2015

Upcoming Grant Opportunities - March 2015

Courtesy of the CRD Grant Writer:

The Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation

Funding available to federally registered non-profit organizations for new cultural and creative arts projects and programming. Funding is also available to social service organizations.

Spring Cycle deadline is March 2, 2015. To apply, visit www.koernerfoundation.ca

BC Real Estate Foundation - General Grant Program

Funding available to local governments, First Nations, and non-profit organizations for projects that help build sustainable communities. Projects must fit under one of the program’s Focus Areas: fresh water, sustainable food systems, and well-planned built environments.

Spring Cycle deadline is March 6, 2015. To apply, visit www.refbc.com

MEC Community Contributions 

Funding available to community organizations for initiatives and infrastructure projects that inspire and enable people to be active outdoors. Funding is also available to organizations for conservation programs and campaigns.

Spring Cycle deadline is March 10, 2015. To apply, visit www.mec.ca

Hamber Foundation 

Funding available to registered charitable organizations for cultural and educational projects that will benefit British Columbians.

Spring Cycle deadline is March 15, 2015. To apply, visit www.hamberfoundation.ca

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Next Steps for NC Arena Replacement Project

Joint Release - City of Quesnel/Cariboo Regional District:

The North Cariboo Joint Planning Committee unanimously endorsed a resolution to proceed with the Arena Replacement Project on the site as proposed during the public consultation process prior to the referendum in June 2014. The site which is located on the parking lot of the former Cariboo Regional District Library is adjacent to the existing Twin Arenas.

In order to proceed with the proposed site, the joint planning committee directed staff to work with CEI Architecture and the recently-acquired project manager, MKT Development Group Inc. to include value engineering suggestions to align project costs more closely with the budget, without losing the spirit and intent of the referendum.

We gave a strong message last night to the architect that this project remains a $17 million project,” states CRD Vice-Chair and North Cariboo Joint Committee Co-Chair Ted Armstrong. “They have been given their marching orders and I look forward to seeing what they come back with including value engineered suggestions to get that price down.”

The most recent Quantity Survey provided an estimated cost of $22.3 million, while the pre-referendum concept-level estimates provided to the Cariboo Regional District and the City of Quesnel was $17 million. The cost increases can be attributed largely to unanticipated site development costs, which significantly exceeded the initial concept level estimates.

“I’m confident that the unanimous decision we made will enable this project to proceed in a timely manner and within the spirit and intent of the referendum,” says Quesnel Mayor Bob Simpson.

During the meeting, the Project Manager also confirmed that now that final location has been determined, completion of the construction drawings can be completed by June with a Request for Proposals from general contractors to follow in August and September. Construction is scheduled to commence in the spring of 2016.

CRD Board Highlights - Feb 18th mtg

Present: Chair A. Richmond, Vice-Chair T. Armstrong; Directors Bruce, Massier, Forseth, Kemp, Sorley, Wagner, Cash, William, Anderson, Coakley, Sharpe, Simpson, Cobb and Campsall

Staff:

J. Bell - CAO
A. Johnston - Corporate Officer
S. Burich - Mgr of Communications
T. Conway - Deputy Mgr of Development Services

Meeting called to order at 9:45am

Agenda approved/Jan 23rd CRD Board meeting minutes adopted as corrected

Business:

Delegations MOB Received

Planning Bylaws:

a) Bylaw #4943 (Area F) was given 1st/2nd Reading
b) Bylaws #4938/4939 (Area L) was given 3rd Reading
c) Bylaw #4940 (Area F) was given 3rd Reading
d) Advisory Planning Commission Bylaw #4946 was given 1st, 2nd, 3rd Reading and Adoption
e) Bylaws #4816/4817 (Area L) were adopted

ALR Applications:

a) The Board approved for submission to the Provincial Ag Land Commission - ALR Application #ALRF20140018

Planning/Building Inspection/Bylaw Enforcement - Other Business:

a) The Board agreed to provide a letter of support to Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada for an Addition to Reserve - Williams Lake Indian Band
b) The Board received the Building Stats for the month of Jan 2015

Environmental Services:

a) The Board received the Water/Sewer Projects report as of Feb 18th
b) The Board authorized Staff to proceed with an amendment to Invasive Plant Bylaw #4740 as follows:

Section 5 of Bylaw 4740 be amended to reduce the control period from twenty-one (21) days to fourteen (14) days.

by the following Stakeholder Vote:

Affirmative - Chair Richmond; Directors Forseth, Massier, William, Armstrong, Bruce, Wagner, Cash, Coakley, Sharpe, and Cobb

Negative - Directors Kemp, Anderson, Sorley

c) The Board received the 2014 Year End Report for the Invasive Plant Management Program
d) The Board authorized a new Policy regarding Enforcement of Invasive Plant Infractions as follows:

Bylaw 4740 prohibits the accumulation of invasive plants on private property and authorizes the Weed Control Officer to order the removal or treatment of
invasive plants. Threats posed by invasive plants vary between individual species and their associated site conditions. The annual Cariboo Chilcotin Coast
Invasive Plant Committee Regional Strategic Plan and the Inter-Ministry Invasive Species Working Group Early Detection Rapid Response Plan identifies those species with the
most significant concern requiring treatment on a prioritized scale as related to the potential threat.

Depending on site conditions, some species require immediate attention, while others can be treated over a longer time period. When administering Bylaw 4740, the Weed Control Officer shall ensure property owners are given the opportunity to voluntarily remove or treat before enforcement actions are taken. The time allotted for voluntary property owner compliance should be proportionate to the
threat posed by the invasive plants.

Pursuant to Section 5 of the Bylaw 4740, if after the expiry of the written notice deadline the property owner has not complied with the notice from the Weed Control Officer, the Cariboo Regional District by its employees, agents or contractors are authorized to enter the property to control the invasive plants by any means necessary

Community Services:

a) The Board authorized a Northern Development Initiative Trust application for improvements to Bouchie Lake Community Hall

Meeting recessed at 11:00am
Meeting resumed at 11:04am

Delegations:

a) Roy Allan, President of the Watch Lake/North Green Lake Volunteer Fire Department, appeared before the Board to discuss collection of fire dues by the Cariboo RD.

A Question/Answer period ensued

Chair Richmond, on behalf of the Board, thanked Mr. Allan for his time/information

Resolved - That Staff report back on the presentation of the Watch Lake/North Green Lake VFD

b) Kimberly Vance-Lundsbye, Healthy Communities Grant Researcher, and Mark Pugh, from Acute Services for Interior Health appeared before the Board to provide an update on Healthy Communities activities.

A Question/Answer period ensued

Chair Richmond, on behalf of the Board, thanked the delegation for their time/information

Resolved - That the final report for Mental Health services be shared with others...

Meeting recessed for lunch at 11:57am
Meeting resumed at 12:30pm

Protective Services:

a) The Board approved the following in regards to the "Playbook" - Provincial Fire Commissioners' new fire training standards guide:

1) the Cariboo Regional District request amendments to the BC Fire Service
Minimum Training Standards Playbook that clarify the definitions of “authority
having jurisdiction” to clarify that Regional Districts are only responsible for
those fire departments they operate directly and instances in which an exterior
operation level service may enter an interior space.

2) the Cariboo Regional District investigate what other regional districts are
doing with respect to fire related safety inspections in the rural areas and the
implications of advising the Fire Commissioner’s Office that Cariboo Regional
District volunteers will no longer act in the capacity of Local Assistant Fire
Commissioners.

Communications:

a) The Board declared the month of March 2015 as "Toastmasters Month" in the Cariboo-Chilcotin at no cost to the Board
b) The Board received the 2015 Budget Consultation Survey Results and Meeting Notes

Finance:

a) The Board ratified the cheque register for Jan 2015 in the amount of $2,579,237.26

Administration:

a) The Board received a letter from the Canadian Union of Postal Workers regarding its efforts in reversing Canada Post’s proposed plan for changes

b) The Board received an Agenda Item Summary from the Corporate Officer regarding a call from NCLGA for a past resolution that requires follow-up action. The Board further approved the following previous NCLGA Resolution for follow-up:

* Palliative Care Fees

c) The Board received a letter from Industry Canada indicating that Industry Minister James Moores is unable to appear before the Board at this time, due to his heavy work schedule

d) The Board received a request from the Cariboo Chilcotin Coast Tourism Association – 2017 Cariboo Celebration

e) The Board received an Agenda item summary from the Corporate Officer regarding Policy #11-10A-26, which calls for interested elected officials to put their name forward for the CRD’s appointment to the NCLGA Board

f) The Board received an Agenda item summary from the Corporate Officer regarding the Alternate Director for Electoral Area 'J'

g) The Board endorsed the following proposed NCLGA Resolution for consideration at the 2015 NCLGA Convention:

SUPPORT FOR FOREST INDUSTRY

WHEREAS the forest industry continues to be an economic mainstays of the
province, providing stable employment for tens of thousands of families, and
contributing $12.4 billion to provincial GDP and $2.5 billion in taxes and fees
to the three levels of government;

AND WHEREAS the competitive advantage of the British Columbia forest
industry has been eroded by cumulative impacts including timber supply
declines, uncertainty on the land base, and delays in provincial market pricing
processes;

AND WHEREAS these cumulative impacts threaten the economic well-being
of communities throughout British Columbia;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the NCLGA call upon the Province to
deliver the full allowable cut under the BC Timber Sales program, complete a
science-based inventory of the available timber supply, and move assertively to
increase operating certainty on the working forest land base.

Board Reports/Correspondence:

a) The Board received the Consent Calendar as of Feb 18th, 2015

b) The Board received the Level 1 Corporate Priorities Report

c) The Board received a letter from the Minister of Aborginal Relations regarding the Treaty Advisory Commitee's letter on NStQ Treaty Settlement Lands

Committtee/Commission Minutes/Recommendations:

a) The Board received the Jan 13th North Cariboo Joint Committee meeting minutes and endorsed 2 recommendations (Alex Fraser Park/Bouchie Lake Recreation Capital Budgets) from that meeting

b) The Board received the Jan 20th North Cariboo Rural Directors' Caucus meeting minutes and endorsed 1 Recommendation (Continue participation in QCEDC) from that meeting

c) The Board received the Jan 22nd Treaty Advisory Committee meeting minutes

d) The Board received the Jan 28th Central Cariboo Rural Directors' Caucus meeting minutes and endorsed 2 Recommendations (Appointments to local Committees and changes to Gavin Lk Forest Education Society Grant in Aide application) from that meeting

e) The Board received the Jan 28th Central Cariboo Joint Committee meeting minutes and endorsed 2 Recommendations (CC Recreation 2015 Business Plan Goal and change to 2015 CC Recreation Budget) from that meeting

Corporate Bylaws:

a) The Board adopted Bylaws #4944/4945 (Areas G/H)

Directors' Requests:

a) The Board appointed various individuals to the Electoral Area A to L Advisory Planning Commissions

b) The Board endorsed a request of Director B. Anderson (Area K) in regards to a letter of support to maintain Grouse Rd as a public road

c) The Board endorsed a request of Director J. Massier (Area C) to send a letter to the Ministry of Transportation/Infrastructure to change the name of a portion of McLean Rd off of the Barkerville Highway (Highway 26)

The Board then held an In-Camera meeting under the provisions of Sections 90(1g - litigation) of the Community Charter) at 2:22pm and resumed its' public meeting at 2:41pm

Directors' then reported on activities or made appointments in their Electoral Area or Municipality

Resolved - That TELUS be invited to present on wireless and internet services in the Cariboo-Chilcotin region at a future Board meeting

Meeting adjourned at 3:25pm


CCRHD Highlights - Feb 18th mtg

Present: Chair J. Massier, Vice-Chair M. Wagner; Directors Armstrong, Bruce, Forseth, Kemp, Sorley, Richmond, Cash, William, Anderson, Coakley, Sharpe, Simpson, Cobb and Campsall

Staff:

J. Bell - CAO
A. Johnston - Corporate Officer
S. Burich - Mgr of Communications
T. Conway - Deputy Mgr of Development Services

Meeting called to order at 9:30am

Agenda approved/Mins of the Jan 23rd CCRHD Board meeting adopted

Business:

1) The Board adopted the following Capital Expenditure Bylaws:

a) Bylaw #98 - Secure Room at Cariboo Memorial Hospital
b) Bylaw #99 - Maternity Unit (Security System/Door Locking) at Cariboo Memorial Hospital
c) Bylaw #100 - Telephone Upgrade at Cariboo Memorial Hospital
d) Bylaw #101 - Radiographic Fluoroscopic Upgrade at Cariboo Memorial Hospital
e) Bylaw #102  - General Radiographic System at 100 Mile General Hospital

2) The Board received the Hospital Consent Calendar as of Feb 18th, 2015

Meeting adjourned at 9:35am

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Round 3 for Business Facade Program in Quesnel

Courtesy of the City of Quesnel:

The City of Quesnel was once again successful in their grant application for $20,000 for commercial façade improvements. The Business Façade Improvement Program, offered for the third time in Quesnel through Northern Development Initiative Trust, provides the opportunity to make commercial areas more inviting and visually appealing to visitors and residents; increase assessed property values; promote private sector investment; build civic pride; and to stimulate the local economy.

“We value our relationship with Northern Development Initiative Trust and appreciate their continued investment in the north. We are extremely pleased that our grant application was successful once again and that we are able to provide this type of assistance to our local businesses,” says Quesnel Mayor Bob Simpson. “The Business Façade Improvement Program makes a significant impact on our local businesses and I would encourage all eligible property and business owners to take advantage of this opportunity.” 

The program offers assistance to property owners and business owners to improve the physical appearance of buildings. The guidelines are intended to maximize the benefit for improving the aesthetics of commercial areas.

The City of Quesnel will provide a 50% reimbursement grant up to a maximum of $5,000 per building/project to improve the facades of commercial buildings. The building must be located in one of the following Development Permit Areas: Downtown Core, West Quesnel, South Quesnel Highway, or Highway Frontage. Each building or business within the area is eligible for a one time grant. Projects must have a minimum total cost of $2,000 in order to qualify and all work must be complete by Dec. 31, 2015.

Eligible improvements include siding, façade painting, awnings, signs, and other exterior improvements. The Program is open to commercial buildings within defined Development Permit Areas. Other eligibility requirements apply, so please visit www.quesnel.ca/Permits.html for full program guidelines or contact the City’s Planning Department at 250-992-2111. 

Applications will be received first come, first served beginning February 16, 2015.  This year, rather than an intake deadline we are accepting applications on an ongoing basis starting today and will continue until all of the funds are allotted.

A map of Eligible Properties, Eligibility Requirements and complete Application details are available on the City’s website at www.quesnel.ca/Permits.html. 

To view the funding programs and success stories of Northern Development Initiative Trust, visit their website at www.northerndevelopment.bc.ca.