Friday, July 3, 2015

WL Council/CRD Board meets next week

Only Williams Lake Council and the Cariboo Regional District will be holding meetings next week as follows:

Williams Lake - Regular Council Meeting on Tuesday, July 7th at 6pm in WL Council Chambers (450 Mart St).  On the Agenda:

* Joint Grant in Aide Process for 2016
* Reconsideration of Williams Lake Golf Club-Encroachment Agreement (at request of Councillor Scott Nelson)
* Approval of New Approving Officer
* Letter re: Parking on Borland Street between 7th and 8th Avenues
* Speed Study Data for Westridge Drive and Foster Way

View the full Agenda here

Cariboo Regional District:

a) Finance/Audit Committee - Tuesday, July 7th at 9am in the CRD Boardroom (180D North 3rd Avenue, Williams Lake).  On the Agenda:

* Presentation of Draft Charts for Directors' Remuneration
* Draft Proposal to CRD Administration Allocation between Municipalities and Electoral Areas
* Update on Performance Audit Program

View the full Agenda here

b) CC Regional Hospital - Friday, July 10th at 9:30am in the CRD Boardroom.  On the Agenda:

* Delegation: Peter De Toit from Interior Health to discuss the Cariboo Memorial Hospital upgrade project, mental health and physician recruitment
* Consent Calendar with 3 Press Releases from Northern Health
* Northern Health Press Release re: Quesnel sees boost in speciality health services
* Request from Northern Health re: Dunrovin Energy Conservation Measures

View the full Agenda here

c) CRD Board Meeting - Friday, July 10th at 9:45am in the CRD Boardroom - On the Agenda:

* Delegation: Todd Hubner re: MOTI's long term plan for roads suffering from flooding or landslide issues

* Various Land Use Matters
* Request of Interlakes Economic Association re: Governance Study
* Various NDIT Applications
* Request from McLeese Lake VFD Society to change use of their approved 2015 Grant for Assistance application
* UBCM Executive Position Nominations
* Appoint Director J. Sorley to the CCBAC Board
* Consent/Financial Consent Calendars
* Ltr from City of WL denying request to provide Dog Control Service to Area 'D'
* Commission/Committee Minutes/Recommendations
* Requests from Directors Forseth (Area D), Richmond (Area G) and Anderson (Area K) to use their Discretionary Funds

There will also be an In-Camera meeting as per Sections 90.1(f, i and k - law enforcement, legal advice and negotiations) of the Community Charter

View the full Agenda here

All Open Fires in BC banned at noon today!

Courtesy of the BC Wildfire Branch:

Effective at noon (Pacific Time) on Friday, July 3, 2015, all open burning, including campfires and fireworks, will be prohibited throughout the majority of the province, Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Minister Steve Thomson announced today.

This prohibition will remain in place until the public is otherwise notified.

This extraordinary step is being taken to help prevent human-caused wildfires and protect public safety. Unseasonably hot and dry weather is being experienced around the province and any preventable, human-caused fires divert critical personnel and resources from other incidents. The BC Wildfire Service is responding to over 150 active fires in the province.

Campfires will still be allowed in the area known as the "Fog Zone" along the western coast of Vancouver Island. A map of the area covered by this open burning prohibition and campfire ban is available online at: http://bit.ly/1IyUZG4

This ban applies to:

- open fires of any size, including campfires;

- the use of fireworks, sky lanterns and tiki torches;

- burning barrels or burning cages of any size or description;

- the use of binary exploding targets (e.g., for rifle target practice); and

- the use of air curtain burners (forced-air burning systems).

This prohibition does not apply to cooking stoves that use gas, propane or briquettes. It also does not apply to a portable campfire apparatus with a CSA or ULC rating that uses briquettes, liquid or gaseous fuel, with a flame length of 15 centimetres or less. The use of this equipment may be prohibited locally and at a later time if deemed necessary so check "current fire bans" online at: www.bcwildfire.ca The use of a portable campfire apparatus that does not meet the conditions noted above is prohibited.

This prohibition covers all BC Parks, Crown and private lands, but does not apply within the boundaries of local governments that have forest fire prevention bylaws and are serviced by a fire department. Please check with civic authorities for any restrictions before lighting a fire.

The "Fog Zone" is a two-kilometre-wide strip along the outer coast of Vancouver Island, stretching from Owen Point (near Port Renfrew) north to the tip of Vancouver Island and around to the boundary of the District of Port Hardy. This strip extends inland two kilometres from the high-tide point. A map of the Fog Zone is available online at: http://bit.ly/1GMvwnU

Anyone found in contravention of an open burning prohibition may be issued a ticket for $345, required to pay an administrative penalty of $10,000 or, if convicted in court, fined up to $100,000 and/or sentenced to one year in jail. If the contravention causes or contributes to a wildfire, the person responsible may be ordered to pay all firefighting and associated costs.

The Hon. Steve Thomson - BC's Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations said:

"We're committed to safeguarding B.C.'s families, natural resources and infrastructure from wildfires. Given the hot and dry conditions in most of the province, we are implementing this provincewide campfire ban to help protect our communities."

Learn more at www.bcwildfire.ca



Video: Grand Opening of Barkerville Accessible Trail

Last weekend - the newly created Barkerville Accessible Trail had its' grand opening.  Those in attendance included Cariboo RD Area 'C' Director John Massier, Cariboo RD Chair Al Richmond, CCBAC Chair (and Quesnel Mayor) Bob Simpson and Cariboo-North MLA Coralee Oakes

Watch the 10 min video below - courtesy of the Cariboo Regional District:



Thursday, July 2, 2015

Quesnel Smoking Bylaw Consultation Survey

From the City of Quesnel website:

Quesnel City Council is currently considering a bylaw prohibiting smoking in specified public spaces and they want to hear from you.  The first reading of the Smoking Regulations Bylaw 1767 was on June 22, 2015.  Prior to providing any further consideration of this bylaw or considering amendments the following survey will be used to obtain resident’s opinions and will be provided back to Council.  Please complete this short 5 question survey by July 28th.
Click here to read the Smoking Regulations Bylaw 1767.
Click here to take the Smoking Bylaw Consultation Survey.

2015 Property Taxes due today!

Today is the final day to pay your property taxes for the 2015 Taxation Year.  If you need assistance, here is contact info by community:

Wells - Ph: 250-994-3330 or wells@goldcity.net or www.wells.ca

Quesnel - Ph: 250-992-2111 or kbolton@quesnel.ca or www.quesnel.ca

Williams Lake - Ph: 250.392.1760 or ikhyeralova@williamslake.ca or www.williamslake.ca

100 Mile House - Ph: 250-395-3625 or fvincenzi@dist100milehouse.bc.ca or www.100milehouse.com

Cariboo RD (Electoral Areas only) -

Quesnel area - Ph: 250-992-4313 or Barbara.Lusk@gov.bc.ca

Williams Lake/Chilcotin areas - 250-398-4211 or Connie.Bauer@gov.bc.ca

100 Mile House area - 250-395-7832 or Connie.Bauer@gov.bc.ca

For Rural Property Taxes payment information - click here

Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Steve's Meeting/Expense Calendar - June 2015

For the month of June 2015 as the CRD Area 'D' Director - I attended the following meetings:

June 2nd - Joint Meeting between CRD Directors for Areas D, E, F, G, L, WL City Council, 100 Mile Council and School District #27 Trustees

June 3rd - Public Hearing on Bylaw #4957 (WL Fringe OCP Amendment Bylaw)

June 5th - Meeting between MLA Oakes, School District #27 Trustees/Staff and myself in regards to Wildwood Elementary plus a lunch with MLA Oakes at the Laughing Loon plus a meeting with MLA Oakes at McLeese Lake with McLeese Lake VFD Society members

June 11th - CRD Policy Committee Meeting & CRD Board in Committee of the Whole

June 16th - School District #27 Wildwood Elementary Closure Meeting

June 17th - CC Rural Caucus/Joint Committee Meetings

June 18th - Meet with McLeese VFD Society

June 22nd - Meeting with CRD CAO J. Bell, Mgr of Development Services K. Moores, CRD Chair Al Richmond regarding outcome of the Public Hearing for CRD Bylaw #4957 and the next steps

June 23rd - Attended Mt Polley Meeting at Sugarcane with CRD Area F Director Joan Sorley and CRD Chair Al Richmond

June 24th - Attended Mt Polley Meeting in the Gibraltar Room - CMRC.  CRD Area F Director Joan Sorley, Williams Lake Mayor Walt Cobb and Cariboo-Chilcotin MLA Donna Barnett in attendance

June 25th - Attended BC Transportation Minister Todd Stone event at the Tourism Discovery Centre.  CRD Area F Director Joan Sorley, Williams Lake Mayor Walt Cobb, WL City Councillors Jason Ryll and Laurie Walters and Cariboo North/Cariboo-Chilcotin MLA's in attendance

June 27th - Participated in the WL Stampede Parade in the morning and then attended the VIP portion of the WL Stampede event at the Stampede Grounds.  CRD Area 'K' Director Betty Anderson, WL Mayor Walt Cobb, WL City Councillor Jason Ryll, WL Indian Band Chief Ann Louie, Cariboo-Chilcotin MLA Donna Barnett and Fed Conservative candidate for Cariboo-Prince George Todd Doherty in attendance

As for expenses submitted for June 2015:

June 11th - CRD Board in COW, $120.00
June 17th - CC Rural Caucus/Joint Committee Meetings - $75.00

~SF

Monday, June 29, 2015

Final Rpt of Local Elxn Expense Limits tabled

Courtesy of the BC Legislature:

Editor's Note - I like the expense limits for Electoral Area Directors', School Trustees, Councillors' and Island Trust representatives at $5,000, Mayors' at $10,000 (under 10,000 in population) and a per capita formula for those over 10,000.  This should lead to more fairer elections and help eliminate the idea of "buying" one's election to local office ...

The all-party Special Committee on Local Elections Expense Limits today released its unanimous report on local elections campaign spending limits.

In jurisdictions with a population less than 10,000, the committee recommends expense limits of $10,000 for mayoral candidates and $5,000 for all other candidates including councillor, school trustee, electoral area directors, and Islands Trust representatives.

In jurisdictions with a population 10,000 or more, the committee recommends a per capita formula to reflect that the size of the community significantly affects a candidate’s campaign costs. To ensure the expense limits are meaningful, the committee also recommends that the spending limits apply to candidates beginning January 1 in the calendar year of the local elections.

“We heard from the public that running for local government must be accessible and affordable. Our recommendations allow reasonable spending, while promoting fair and accessible local elections,” said committee chair Jackie Tegart. “The committee’s report recognizes the importance of local government and the need for fair local elections in a democratic system of governance.”

“The committee unanimously agreed to recommend flexible expense limits which recognize the different needs of smaller and larger communities as well as the differences between mayoral candidates and candidates for other locally elected offices,” added deputy chair Selina Robinson. “We thank the many individuals and organizations that contributed to our work.”

The committee’s work was based on significant public consultation, a review of spending data from 2014 local elections campaign finance disclosure statements, and careful consideration of important public policy questions. The committee posted the 2014 local elections spending data used to inform its recommendations on its website, along with the report containing its detailed recommendations.

The committee’s recommendations for expense limits amounts build on its December 2014 report, endorsing principles of fairness, neutrality, transparency, and accountability in local elections. The committee’s report, along with further information on the committee’s work, is available at: https://www.leg.bc.ca/cmt/leel

Barkerville Cemetery Accessible Trail Officially Open

Courtesy of the Cariboo Regional District:

The historic town of Barkerville is the most recent community in the Cariboo Chilcotin to unveil a new accessible trail. The Barkerville Cemetery Accessible Trail was built in partnership between the Cariboo Regional District, the Barkerville Heritage Trust, Friends of Barkerville, Northern Development Initiative Trust, Cariboo Chilcotin Beetle Action Coalition and the provincial government through the BC Community Recreation Program.

“The completion of this new accessible trail adds another great feature to the popular historic town of Barkerville. I applaud the work and leadership of the Cariboo Regional District, and the many businesses and individuals whose support and financial contributions have made this new trail a reality. Together, you have created a valuable public gathering place for individuals of all levels of mobility to enjoy for years to come,” said Coralee Oakes, Minister of Community, Sport and Cultural Development.

Approximately 750 metres long, the Barkerville Cemetery Trail follows along of a portion of the old Cariboo Wagon Road, providing a unique route between the Barkerville town site and the Barkerville Cemetery. Visitors of all mobility levels can enjoy this picturesque trail with access to the historic cemetery.

“It is with great pleasure we are able to officially open another trail in the Cariboo Chilcotin and take the next step towards developing the region as an accessible and inclusive tourism destination,” stated CRD Electoral Area C Director John Massier. “Partnering with Barkerville, the province, NDIT and CCBAC has helped us expand access to this site to those with limited mobility and I know it will be an outdoor attraction for both residents and tourists.”

Five rest stops are interspersed along the trail route and an informational kiosk is provided for users’ convenience. The trail has a packed, six foot wide crushed gravel surface with a gentle grade and sections of moderate difficulty.

“The official trail opening is the completion of a vision to connect the Barkerville site and the Barkerville Cemetery in an inclusive way,” stated Barkerville Historic Town’s Chief Executive Officer, Ed Coleman. “The Barkerville Heritage Trust is very excited to provide an additional opportunity for people of all mobility levels to enjoy Barkerville’s rich history, and we would like to thank everyone who helped make this trail a reality.”

“The Barkerville Cemetery Accessible Trail means that more people will be able to learn about and enjoy the incredible history behind B.C.'s Cariboo region. Northern Development is proud to have played a small role in helping to make this first-class attraction more accessible,” states Janine North, CEO of Northern Development Initiative Trust.

“The Cariboo Chilcotin Beetle Action Coalition is excited to be a part of this regional project,” stated CCBAC Chair, Bob Simpson. “It is an excellent example of how partnerships, cooperation and collaboration can achieve great results. Projects such as the Barkerville Cemetery Accessible Trail improve our communities by making our region accessible to all and enhance the visitor experience in the Cariboo Chilcotin.”

The Barkerville Cemetery Accessible Trail is located 81 kilometres east of Quesnel on Highway 26. Ongoing management of the site is provided by the Barkerville Heritage Trust.

For further information about the growing list of accessible trails within the Cariboo Regional District, visit us online at cariboord.ca and look under services/recreation.

About the Community Recreation Program
The $30-million Community Recreation Program was developed to address the unique challenges faced by communities in the Province with respect to meeting their recreational infrastructure needs. The program invests in local government capital projects that make communities healthier, more active places in which to live. Through the duration of the program, the B.C. government provided grants for 98 recreation projects throughout B.C. – to help fund everything from bike paths, trails, fitness facilities and walkways to playgrounds and recreation centres.

About the CRD Accessible Trail Network
The CRD Board passed a resolution in 2006 to work towards developing the Cariboo Chilcotin as a world leader in accessible outdoor recreation and tap into niche tourism markets for persons of low mobility. Other wheelchair accessible sites within the CRD include Tatlayoko, Kersley, Cottonwood Historic Site, 108 Mile/Sepa Lakes, Lac La Hache, Horsefly Salmon Spawning Trails, Gavin Lakeshore Trail, and most recently the Dugan Lake Accessible Trail which was officially opened in May 2015. There are currently six other accessible wilderness trails being developed by the CRD, some of which were funded through the Community Recreation Program.

Friday, June 26, 2015

89th WL Stampede starts today!

Today the 4 day event called the Williams Lake Stampede begins.  It is the 89th event since its' inception in 1926

There are too many events to list here so you can read the 4 day brochure here or you can visit the Williams Lake Stampede website here

I will be participating in some of the events including the Stampede Parade on Saturday with my colleague, CRD Area 'F' Director Joan Sorley, on behalf of the CRD

Don't forget about Canada Day next Wednesday as well.  I will be saying a few words on behalf of the CRD

In addition - there is also the Sunday Farmers' Market in McLeese Lake from 9am - 1pm by the Oasis Pub

Stay cool this weekend by finding shade and drinking lots of fluids... Also - don't forget to take extreme care with your campfire... there are no campfire bans within the Cariboo Fire Centre but there is a campfire ban in parts of the Coastal Fire Centre.  Find the latest information here

Finally - there are no scheduled local government meetings next week so enjoy your long weekend with your family...

~SF

Thursday, June 25, 2015

WL Minor Hockey receives Prov $$$

Courtesy of the BC Government Caucus:

The Williams Lake Minor Hockey Association (WLMHA) is benefiting from $87,500 in funding towards its Minor Hockey Program for youth 5-18 years of age.

"The provincial gaming grant is an invaluable and appreciated source of funding that assists minor hockey associations like Williams Lake in providing affordable access for children to play the game of hockey,” said President of WLMHA, Jonathan Jackson. “Without it, many kids would not have the opportunity to play this wonderful sport, and would miss out on being influenced by the many extraordinary coaches and mentors who make positive differences in these kids' lives yearly.”

“Hockey develops skills on the ice that build a foundation for a lifetime of memories, friendships and pride,” said Cariboo-Chilcotin MLA Donna Barnett. “This funding will support the Williams Lake Minor Hockey Association and the young players build leadership skills, boost self-confidence and self-respect, while having fun on the ice.”

“The benefits of hockey and organized youth sports have the capacity to positively impact children’s lives in so many ways,” said Cariboo North MLA Coralee Oakes. “I am pleased that our Williams Lake and area youth will benefit from this funding providing healthy, active and character building recreation in our community.”

The Community Gaming Grants to this organization was made possible through the Sports and Arts and Culture intake. Grants through this intake go towards programs that contribute to the quality of life in a community, including assisting the disadvantaged or distressed, promoting health, or enhancing opportunities for youth.

Every year, the provincial government approves $135 million in gaming grants that benefit over 5,000 local organizations that serve communities throughout British Columbia.

Organizations interested in applying for Community Gaming Grants can find information and applications at pssg.gov.bc.ca/gaming

Quesnel Sports Programs get Prov $$$

Courtesy of the BC Government Caucus:

Four Quesnel-based organizations are sharing more than $141,000 in the latest round of provincial gaming grants to support the delivery of local sport programs.

The Quesnel and District Minor Hockey Association is receiving $63,500 towards its Minor Hockey program. The Quesnel Youth Soccer Association is receiving $53,040 to enhance skill development and strengthen Youth Soccer leagues. Additionally, the Quesnel Aquatic Club is receiving $8,800 that will benefit its summer swimming program and the Cariboo Ski-Touring Club is receiving $16,170 towards its Youth Ski School including biathlon and enhancing its community participation and skill development programs.

“This grant money means that our small minor hockey association is able to keep fees reasonable so that all the children in our community can have the opportunity to play hockey,” said Mike Russell, President of Quesnel and District Minor Hockey Association. “We are grateful to the Government of B.C. for their continuing support of minor sports that allows the kids in communities like ours all over the province to stay active, learn new things and meet new people.”

“The talent of our youth and those of all ages and athletic abilities in the Quesnel and area is diverse,” said Cariboo North MLA Coralee Oakes. “I am delighted this funding will give our community increased opportunities to participate in sports activities that will develop skills and maximize the athletes’ experiences.”

The Community Gaming Grants to these four organizations were made possible through the Sports and Arts and Culture intake. Grants through this intake go towards programs that contribute to the quality of life in a community, including assisting the disadvantaged or distressed, promoting health, or enhancing opportunities for youth.

Every year, the provincial government approves $135 million in gaming grants that benefit over 5,000 local organizations that serve communities throughout British Columbia.

Organizations interested in applying for Community Gaming Grants can find information and applications at pssg.gov.bc.ca/gaming

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Highway Upgrades and Study comes to Quesnel

Courtesy of the BC Government:

Local motorists and highway travellers will see better driving conditions on Highway 97 in the Quesnel area from a new paving project and an upcoming transportation study, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Todd Stone announced today.

A $5.8-million paving project is soon to start, resurfacing approximately 35 kilometres of Highway 97 and over six kilometres of local side roads.

The ministry is also providing $300,000 over the next two years to do a Highway 97 corridor analysis to determine the traffic patterns and long-term transportation needs of Quesnel, and to assess the economic potential of an east-west connector.

“The highway and roads in Quesnel serve both the community and the local natural resource industries and it’s critical that this important link in the provincial road network be maintained to provide for the safe and efficient movement of people and goods,” said Stone. “In B.C. on the Move, our 10-year transportation plan, we committed to work with the City of Quesnel to establish future project priorities to improve traffic flow through the downtown core. We’re looking forward to starting a much-needed study to address the area’s transportation needs.”

Resurfacing will start shortly in four main areas including:

Highway 97 between Quartz Road and the junction with Highway 26.
Highway 97 between Naver Road and Plett Road.
The approach to the weigh scale located south of the junction of Highway 97 and Highway 26.
6.6 km of local side roads.

The recycled asphalt product generated from the milling of the pavement on Highway 97 will be re-used to resurface the local side roads. Paving will provide a smoother, more comfortable ride while improving the safety and efficiency of this critical transportation hub.

“This region is experiencing continued growth as a result of economic activity,” said MLA for Cariboo North Coralee Oakes. “The road work being done is essential to support the local and provincial traffic in the area. It’s also time to take a good hard look at the traffic movements of the area such that we can focus on improving the movement of goods and services for the long term.”

The rehabilitation of provincial highways, bridges and side roads is a priority of B.C. on the Move, a 10-year transportation plan that outlines critical investments and improvements through the province to improve the daily lives of British Columbians.

Learn More:

B.C. on the Move is available online at: engage.gov.bc.ca/transportationplan/

Follow the work of the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure at: tranbc.ca

More $$$ for Invasive Plants

Courtesy of the BC Government:

The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure has committed an additional $2.25 million over the next three years to reduce the spread of invasive species in B.C.

“Invasive plants can have serious effects on many industries, as well as to the natural ecosystems on which we rely,” said Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Todd Stone. “This additional funding supports government’s commitment to protect B.C. from the impacts of invasive species, and helps the ministry specifically target invasive species on roadsides and in gravel pits.”

When gravel from pits contaminated with invasive plants is used in ministry operations, there can be serious effects on the environment and industry. Of the additional funding, over $750,000 will be targeted over the next three years to increased management of invasive plants in ministry gravel pits and quarries. The remaining $1.5 million will be used to increase the management of invasive species on highway rights of way.

This builds on the commitment in B.C. on the Move, the Province’s 10-year transportation plan, of $3.9 million over three years for invasive species management, and raises the ministry’s budget to more than $6 million over the next three years.

“During ‘Invasive Species Action Month’, the Province is committing this additional funding to help to ensure that priority invasive species can be more effectively managed,” said Cariboo North MLA and Minister of Community, Sport and Cultural Development Coralee Oakes. “We’re taking action, here in the Cariboo and around the province, to contain and reduce the spread of aggressive, non-native species.”

The ministry’s invasive species management program is supported primarily through partnerships with local governments, First Nations, and non-profit invasive species committees throughout B.C. This year’s funding will be allocated between over 20 agencies across all areas of the province to target the highest priority species in each region.

“The Cariboo Regional District is grateful for the increase in funding to address the issue of invasive plants within our region,” said Cariboo Regional District vice chair Ted Armstrong. “This increase will be used specifically for the treatment of invasive plants in gravel pits in the Cariboo Chilcotin.”

“The B.C. government is doing important work in tackling invasive species at the source in gravel pits and roadsides to curtail their spread along our travel corridors,” said Invasive Species Council of B.C chair Barry Gibbs. “Clean, weed-free gravel pits and sound practices along road corridors will greatly reduce the dispersal of invasive plants across the landscape.”

The ministry manages over 40,000 kilometres of highways and over 2,000 gravel pits across B.C. Last year alone, the ministry removed the equivalent of 500 hectares of invasive plants, comprised of over 80 different species, from road sides and gravel pits.

Quick Facts:

Invasive plants are non-native plants brought to B.C. either accidentally or as landscaping or medicinal plants. They often have incredible abilities to reproduce and spread and do not have natural pests or pathogens here to keep them in check. They can choke out native plants and have a significant impact on agriculture, tourism, fish and wildlife habitat, water quality, and public safety.
Some invasive species found in B.C. that are currently a concern include: four varieties of knotweed (Japanese, giant, bohemian and Himalayan), giant hogweed, European common reed and wild chervil.
Other targeted invasive plant species include: marsh plume thistle, spotted knapweed, black henbane, garlic mustard, blueweed, common tansy, tansy ragwort, hoary alyssum, field scabious, leafy spurge, yellow flag iris, Himalayan balsam and orange and yellow (non-native) hawkweeds.

Wildwood Elementary closes July 31st

Courtesy of School District #27 (Cariboo-Chilcotin):

At last night’s public meeting the Board of Education discussed the fate of Wildwood
Elementary School.

Since 21 April 2015, the Wildwood Elementary School facility has been temporarily
closed due to flooding and mould issues. Wildwood Elementary has operated as a
“school within a school” out of Marie Sharpe Elementary in Williams Lake for the
balance of the school year.

A public consultation forum was held on 16 June 2015 where 25-30 staff, parents,
government representatives, and citizens gathered to hear firsthand the extent of the
devastation the flooding caused to the building, to ask questions, and to present ideas.

Wildwood Elementary School PAC President Cassie Blaine, with support of other parents, addressed
the Board last night, in a final plea to keep the school open.

After a lengthy debate of the options that may be available to the Board and citing the
insurmountable costs to remediate the existing site and costs to replace the facility, the
Board, in the end, unanimously agreed to close the school.

The Board also passed a motion to incorporate the Wildwood Elementary School
catchment area into the Marie Sharpe catchment area. This means that the existing
students of Wildwood become students of Marie Sharpe Elementary School. The Board
further approved changes that will allow current families of Wildwood Elementary,
wishing to enroll in a different school then Marie Sharpe Elementary, special
consideration. Parents wanting to explore this avenue should contact their School Principal or the School Board Office. Bus routes will also be reviewed by District Staff.

The Chair for the Board of Education - School District #27 (Cariboo-Chilcotin) Tanya Guenther said:

“As I stated last month, this was a very difficult
decision to make and it was not made lightly. Although the outcome is not one that
anyone wanted, we thank the parents and the community for their patience and
understanding as we worked through this process. We wish the students and their
families a great summer and a rewarding 2015-2016 school year as they officially join
the community of Marie Sharpe Elementary.”

2015 Canada Day in WL

I'll be saying a few words on behalf of the Cariboo RD at this year's Canada Day celebration in Boitanio Park on Wednesday, July 1st... See poster below for full details:


Tuesday, June 23, 2015

WildSafe BC returns to Quesnel

Courtesy of the City of Quesnel:

WildSafeBC returns for a second season to the community of Quesnel. The coordinator this year is Lita Conlin and she will be active as a resource for people that wish to learn how to reduce human-wildlife conflict in the community.

Bear season is well underway and multiple bear sightings have already been reported in and around Quesnel. Improperly managed garbage is still the number one attractant in Quesnel. Lita Conlin is asking residents to "Keep garbage in a secure location until immediately prior to scheduled pick-up, this will aid in deterring bears from coming into your neighborhood."

To learn how you can help keep wildlife wild and communities safe, you can:

Contact Lita Conlin by phone at 250-992-5743
Follow WildSafeBC on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/WildSafeBCQuesnel.

Public Open House - Quesnel Parks Plan

Courtesy of the City of Quesnel FB Page:

The Parks Plan recommendations are ready for public review and we would like your feedback. Thank you for your input in March regarding our City’s parks.

An open house to review the recommendations will be held at City Hall in the Council Chambers on TONIGHT from 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. to obtain input on the recommendations being considered for the plan. This will be an open format so please feel free to attend at a time convenient for you.

The recommendations will be available on the City’s website at

http://www.quesnel.ca/ourquesnel.html if you wish to review prior to the open house. A survey to gather input on these recommendations will be released along with the recommendations.

For more information on the planning process or the results of the survey completed in March please see http://www.quesnel.ca/ourquesnel.html

Al Richmond on CRD Support for Re-Start of Mt Polley

Yesterday - CRD Chair (and Area 'G' Director) Al Richmond spoke with CBC Daybreak Kamloops on the Cariboo Regional Board's support of Mt Polley restricted re-start application to Victoria

You can listen to the interview here

~SF


Friday, June 19, 2015

Local Gov't Mtgs - Wk of June 22 - 26

A few local government meetings this upcoming week as follows:

Quesnel - Regular Council/Committee of the Whole meeting on Monday, June 22nd at 7pm in Quesnel Council Chambers (2nd Floor - 410 Kinchant St).  On the Agenda:

* Presentation of Employee Retirement or Long Service Awards
* In COW: Presentation of Quesnel Airport Business Plan

* In Council:

a) Items from Committees including recommendation from Policy Committee around Smoking Regulations

b) Transition to Community Mailbox from Door to Door Service (Canada Post)
c)Pay-Parking at North Cariboo Community Campus
d) 2014 City of Quesnel Annual Report
e) Lease Renewal/Residential Garbage Truck Storage

View the full Agenda here

School District #27 (Cariboo-Chilcotin) - Regular Board of Education Meeting on Tuesday, June 23rd at 6:30pm in the SD27 Boardroom (350 2nd Avenue, Williams Lake).  When available, the Agenda can be viewed here

Williams Lake - Regular Council Meeting on Tuesday, June 23rd at 6pm in WL Council Chambers (450 Mart St, WL).  On the Agenda:

Delegations (2) - Cheyleigh Sand (2015/16 WL Stampede Queen); Kane Fraser re: 2014 Audited Financial Statements for the City of Williams Lake

Business:

a) 2014 Statement of Financial Information which outlines what Staff over $75,000 made last year plus remuneration/expenses for the final year of the 2011-14 Council which included former Mayor Kerry Cook and former City Councillors Geoff Bourdon, Surinderpal Rathor and Danica Hughes plus current City Councillors Sue Zacharias, Laurie Walters and Ivan Bonnell

b) 2014 Annual City of Williams Lake Report
c) Approval for Mayor Cobb to attend the 2015 Billy Barker Days in Quesnel - July 18th
d) 2 Encroachment Agreements
d) DVP #04-2015 - Jeanette Beddington - Setback Reduction for Carport & Deck - 1185 Second Avenue North
e) Installation of Lighting & Place Millings for Downtown Parking Areas
f) Development Permit #03-2015 Edward Kozuki (Burgess Plumbing, Heating & Electrical Co. Ltd.) - Replacement of Exterior Façade & Roof Canopy - 36 Broadway Avenue North

g) Airport Road Rehabilitation Strategic Priorities Fund Application

View the full Agenda here

Cariboo Regional District: Meetings as follows

Mon, Jun 22nd - South Cariboo Rural Caucus at 4pm in 100 Mile Council Chambers (385 Birch Avenue, 100 Mile House) .  On the Agenda:

a) District of 100 Mile House 50th Anniversary
b) Cariboo Family Enrichment Centre - Letter of Thanks

View the full Agenda here

Mon, Jun 22nd - South Cariboo Joint Committee at 5pm, also in 100 Mile Council Chambers

a) Update from 100 Mile RCMP
b) 100 Mile Lodge Architectural Review
c) Proposed Water Park Location / South Cariboo Recreation Budget
d) Proposed Capital Plan Amendment for Ball Field Lighting
e) Appointments to Joint Use Committee
f) Interior Roads Request for Feedback
g) Letter of Thanks from Greeny Lake VFD

View the full Agenda here

Also - local community events

Quesnel -  Emcon Services Inc will be conducting maintenance on the Quesnel River Bridge starting June 21, 2015 through June 26, 2015 from 6 p.m. – 6 a.m. daily. This will result in single lane alternating traffic with delays of up to 20 minutes. If you have any questions, please contact EMCON Services at 250-992-8809.

Williams Lake - Community Mtg in regards to Mt Polley on Wednesday, June 24th from 7-9pm in the Gibraltar Room, CMRC (535 Proctor St).  Also the annual Aboriginal Day goes in Boitanio Park on Sunday, June 21st

McLeese Lake - Sunday Farmers' Market at the Info Centre (between the Oasis Pub and Cafe) from 9am - 1pm

108 Lake Accessible Trail Officially Open

Courtesy of the Cariboo Regional District:

The 108 Mile Ranch is the latest community in the Cariboo Chilcotin to develop a wheelchair accessible wilderness trail. It’s called the 108 Lake Accessible Trail and was developed in partnership between the Cariboo Regional District (CRD); the Ministry of Community, Sport and Cultural Development through the BC Community Recreation Program; Northern Development Initiative Trust; the Cariboo Chilcotin Beetle Action Coalition; and the 108 Greenbelt Commission.

“Community trails are more than just a public pathway. These trails are places where people connect and spend time with friends and family; while enjoying nature and recreational activities. The Cariboo Regional District has done a great job working towards their goals of accessibility and inclusion through these trail upgrades. The 108 Lake Accessible Trail is the latest example in a network of wheelchair accessible trails being completed through funding from Province’s Community Recreation Program and through the hard work, commitment, and vision of CRD Board of Directors,” said Donna Barnett, MLA for Cariboo-Chilcotin.

From the $401,250 Community Recreation Program grant awarded to the Cariboo Regional District for the accessible trail upgrade projects, $85,000 was dedicated to the 108 Lake Accessible Trail.

“I am extremely pleased that we have now completed the 108 Lake Accessible Trail,” stated CRD Chair and Electoral Area G Director Al Richmond. “This is the next step in making the Cariboo Chilcotin one of the most attractive wheelchair accessible tourism destinations in the world. Projects such as the 108 Lake Accessible Trail shows what can be accomplished through regional collaboration and commitment to improving the quality of life for residents and visitors of all abilities.”

The 108 Lake Accessible Trail connects to the Sepa Lake Accessible Trail and together they provide seven kilometres of gentle graded low mobility trail along the picturesque lakes. Two accessible outhouses, ten benches and rest stops providing beautiful views, and three accessible picnic tables are available for visitors’ use.

“The Commission is very excited to showcase the new fully accessible 108 Lake Accessible Trail,” said 108 Greenbelt Commission Chair, Ron Soeder. “We would like to thank all of our partners who joined us in making this trail a reality. Those with low mobility who could not previously experience this area are now included and can fully enjoy this beautiful trail.”

“British Columbia’s Cariboo Chilcotin is known for its rugged and beautiful landscapes, but these amazing parts of our province are often difficult to access for people with mobility issues. Accessible travel is one of the fastest growing tourism markets in North America, and this trail project means our region has become that much more accessible to residents and visitors alike,” said Janine North, CEO, Northern Development.

“The Cariboo Chilcotin Beetle Action Coalition is excited to be a part of this regional project,” stated CCBAC Chair, Bob Simpson. “It is an excellent example of how partnerships, cooperation and collaboration can achieve great results. Projects such as the 108 Lake Accessible Trail improve our communities by making our region accessible to all, and enhance the visitor experience in the Cariboo Chilcotin.”

The 108 Lake and Sepa Lake Accessible Trails can be accessed at the 108 Mile Heritage Site, which is 13km north of 100 Mile House and can be accessed directly off of Highway 97, or Kallum Drive at the 108 Mile Ranch. An information kiosk at the 108 Mile Heritage Site displays a map of the site and the trail.

Ongoing management of the site is provided by the 108 Greenbelt Commission.

For further information about the growing list of accessible trails within the Cariboo Regional District, visit us online at cariboord.ca and look under services/recreation.

About the Community Recreation Program

The $30-million Community Recreation Program was developed to address the unique challenges faced by communities in the Province with respect to meeting their recreational infrastructure needs. The program invests in local government capital projects that make communities healthier, more active places in which to live. Through the duration of the program, the B.C. government provided grants for 98 recreation projects throughout B.C. – to help fund everything from bike paths, trails, fitness facilities and walkways to playgrounds and recreation centres.

About the CRD Accessible Trail Network

The CRD Board passed a resolution in 2006 to work towards developing the Cariboo Chilcotin as a world leader in accessible outdoor recreation and tap into niche tourism markets for persons of low mobility. Other wheelchair accessible sites within the CRD include Tatlayoko, Kersley, Cottonwood Historic Site, 108 Mile/Sepa Lakes, Lac La Hache, Horsefly Salmon Spawning Trails, Gavin Lakeshore Trail, and most recently the 99 Mile Accessible Trail. There are currently eight other accessible wilderness trails being developed by the CRD, some of which were funded through the Community Recreation Program.

Update on RB/Use of ALR Lands for Growing Trees

Courtesy of the BC Government:

Agriculture Minister Norm Letnick has issued the following statement following a productive meeting between ministry staff and Reckitt Benckiser (RB) Group regarding its Trees for Change Programme:

“I would like to thank RB for taking the concerns of British Columbians seriously, and meeting with ministry staff to discuss opportunities for moving forward together.

“It is clear that we have a shared interest in promoting environmental leadership while also working to preserve B.C.’s productive agricultural land for agriculture.

“It is encouraging to hear that RB is in the process of reviewing their Trees for Change Programme to ensure that it is meeting its objectives and to build support with local communities and stakeholders.

“I am especially pleased to hear that in conducting their review they will not make any new offers to purchase land nor will they prepare existing lands, buy seed or plant new trees.

“And I am very happy to hear they are open to considering new approaches to respond to the concerns of British Columbians.

“Thanks to RB again for taking the time to work with the ministry, the Agricultural Land Commission and other interested parties here in B.C. I look forward to continuing to work together over the coming weeks and months.”

B.C. making progress toward FN Reconciliation

Courtesy of the BC Government:

Responding to the “calls to action” in the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, the B.C. government has strongly reaffirmed its commitment to advance the process of reconciliation with Aboriginal people.

“Given our history and the impacts of the federal Indian Residential School system, reconciliation was never going to be an easy journey,” said John Rustad, Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation. “But our commitment to reconciliation with Aboriginal people is unwavering and we are making significant progress.”

Directed primarily at the federal government, the Truth and Reconciliation report includes many recommendations that can and are being addressed by the B.C. government. With the guidance of First Nations leaders and Aboriginal people, the Province is contributing to meaningful reconciliation in a broad range of important areas.

“Like the Truth and Reconciliation Commission we feel this is an issue, not just for First Nations, but for all Canadians,” said Chief Dr. Robert Joseph, Reconciliation Canada Ambassador. “We are grateful to see the Province of B.C. working on a number of fronts - education, advanced education, health, child welfare and the justice system - to address the ongoing impacts of residential schools.”

In education, B.C. is about to take a major step forward that will respond to one of the primary calls to action. Aboriginal history, culture and perspectives have been integrated into the new K-12 curriculum about to be released to teachers and schools. The integration of the history and ongoing legacy of the residential school system will be further enhanced in the new curriculum - particularly when students study topics such as discrimination, inequality, oppression and the impacts of colonialism.

“With education comes positive change,” said Peter Fassbender, Minister of Education. “Through the revised curriculum, we will be promoting greater understanding, empathy and respect for Aboriginal history and culture among students and their families.”

The Truth and Reconciliation report also calls on governments to improve health services and eliminate employment gaps between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people.

The new First Nations Health Authority is the first such entity created in Canada and is working with First Nations, Health Canada, the B.C. Ministry of Health and the provincial health system to implement the BC Tripartite First Nations Health Plan to improve First Nations and Aboriginal health programs and services, as well as fostering a health and wellness approach that reflects the culture of First Nations.

The Province is investing up to $30 million over three years for skills training in First Nations communities participating in LNG opportunities. The Province also commits $8 million annually to community and employer partnerships. Aboriginal persons are a priority for these initiatives. These projects help to ensure Aboriginal people have greater access to jobs, training, and education opportunities and support B.C.'s Skills for Jobs Blueprint goal of adding 15,000 Aboriginal people to the workforce within 10 years.

B.C. and First Nations have also achieved well over 300 economic and reconciliation agreements - more than 200 within the past five years. These agreements provide economic and social benefits for First Nations and greater certainty about land use and resources.

These are just some of the many ongoing steps the B.C. government is taking to redress the dark legacy of Canada’s Indian Residential Schools system and seek reconciliation with Aboriginal people. Achieving reconciliation is a priority for government and will provide long-term benefits and opportunities for all British Columbians.

Backgrounder:

B.C. making progress toward reconciliation

“Honouring the Truth, Reconciling for the Future”, is the final report of Truth and Reconciliation Canada’s findings following a six-year mandate to hear more than 6,750 survivor and witness statements after more than a century of abuse at Indian Residential Schools.

Indian Residential Schools operated in Canada between the 1880s and 1990s. The last residential school closed in British Columbia in 1983.

The report resulted in substantive recommendations to all levels of government to advance reconciliation with Aboriginal people. B.C. continues to make progress in key areas such as supports for children in care, education, health, and in working with Aboriginal leaders, government agencies, industry, and local governments to support reconciliation agreements with First Nations.

The Province’s reconciliation efforts are broad and comprehensive, firmly rooted in principles of justice and fairness, and go beyond issues of rights and title.

Reconciliation Agreements

First Nations communities have been left out of economic opportunities and consultation for far too long. Through economic and reconciliation agreements, the Province and First Nations are creating the opportunity for lasting resolution of First Nations and Provincial interests.
The Province and First Nations have achieved more than 300 economic and reconciliation agreements in the last decade, more than 200 in the past five years.

K-12 Education

The provincial K-12 curriculum is being revised. The Ministry of Education has already been working with development teams and other educational partners to ensure the history and legacy of residential schools is even more thoroughly covered in B.C.’s curriculum.

These partners include the First Nations Schools Association, First Nations Education Steering Committee, the BC Teachers’ Federation and the Aboriginal Education unit of the Ministry of Education.

Fifty-six of B.C.’s 60 school districts have implemented Aboriginal Education Enhancement Agreements at the local level as a strategy to positively impact racism and build awareness of the residential school legacy.

Post-secondary Education

The Ministry of Advanced Education worked with Aboriginal Post-Secondary Education and Training Partners, including the First Nations Education Steering Committee, the Indigenous Adult and Higher Learning Association, and Métis Nation BC, to develop the 2012 Aboriginal Post-Secondary Education and Training Policy Framework and Action Plan. The plan aims to increase the number of credentials awarded to Aboriginal students to more than 4,500 by 2020-21.

As set out in that plan, and in order to reduce financial barriers for Aboriginal students (status and non-status First Nations, Métis and Inuit), the Ministry of Advanced Education has provided:

$1 million in one-time funding for financial assistance for Aboriginal students taking masters and doctoral degrees (administered by the Irving K. Barber B.C. Scholarship Society).
$2 million in one-time funding to establish the Aboriginal Teacher Education Award which provides financial assistance for Aboriginal learners in teacher education programs (administered by the I.K. Barber B.C. Scholarship Society).
$4.3 million in one-time funding to establish an Aboriginal Emergency Financial Assistance Fund to provide support for students experiencing a short-term financial crisis.
$12 million funding for the BC Aboriginal Award which provides financial assistance to Aboriginal students for post-secondary education and training.

Children in Care

In the last 10 years, Ministry of Children and Family Development has more than tripled funding to Delegated Aboriginal Agencies to $96 million per year. These Aboriginal agencies provide child welfare and other child and family-related community services.

A top priority for the ministry is ensuring Aboriginal children and youth have access to culturally sensitive mental health and substance use supports, as well as access to early intervention and prevention services to help ensure the cycle of intergenerational trauma and abuse does not continue.

B.C. was the first province to endorse Jordan’s Principle, a child-first principle to resolve jurisdictional disputes between governments regarding payment for services provided to First Nations children.

The ministry is implementing cultural competency training for employees, caregivers and community social service agencies to ensure the needs of Aboriginal children and youth are thoroughly considered when decisions about their care are made.
The ministry is funding a new model of Aboriginal early childhood development that focuses on direct services and measurable outcomes for Aboriginal children and their families.

Domestic Violence

In April 2015, under the three-year Provincial Domestic Violence Plan, MCFD provided $1 million to Stroh Health Care and the BC Association of Aboriginal Friendship Centres for the development of preventative community-based programming for perpetrators of domestic violence.
Social and Cultural

The First Peoples Cultural Council is a one-of-a-kind Crown Corporation responsible to the Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation that focuses on the revitalization of Aboriginal language, arts and culture in British Columbia.

The ministry has established the BC Aboriginal Youth Workers Network, comprised of 140 diverse service providers, leaders and advocates who support work related to youth engagement and youth leadership development.

The ministry also provides support for the Unified Aboriginal Youth Collective, which has created an opportunity for government and Aboriginal youth leaders to work together on key issues that impact Aboriginal youth.

The ministry formed the Minister’s Advisory Committee on Aboriginal Women and, in June 2014, signed a Memorandum of Understanding to work together to end violence against Aboriginal women and girls and improve their quality of life.

With over 75% of the Aboriginal population living off reserve, MARR, along with the Federal Urban Aboriginal Strategy and the Union of British Columbia Municipalities has been working with the BC Association of Friendship Centres, and the Métis Nation, to develop and deliver the Off Reserve Aboriginal Action Plan.

Sports and Reconciliation

The Ministry of Community, Sport and Cultural Development, through an annual contribution of $680,000 to the Aboriginal Sport, Recreation and Physical Activity Partners Council, delivers sport programs and services to Aboriginal people in B.C.
In 2013-14, the Partners Council delivered programs to more than 7,000 Aboriginal people in First Nations, Métis Chartered Communities and urban centres at over 300 events.

The Ministry of Health provides funding for the Aboriginal Healthy Living Activities program, also delivered by the Partners' Council.
Health

The Ministry of Health works closely with provincial and local partners to provide culturally appropriate health care service delivery to First Nations, Inuit, and Métis people both on reserve or within their home communities, and away-from-home (including urban populations and people living off-reserve or away from home communities).

The Ministry of Health, in conjunction with Health Canada and Aboriginal organizations including the First Nations Health Authority, has implemented the Tripartite First Nations Health Plan and the Tripartite Framework Agreement on First Nation Health Governance to develop and support programs addressing First Nations and Aboriginal health in British Columbia.

Regional health authorities, in partnership with the Provincial Health Services Authority, provide assessment and diagnosis services for children with complex developmental behavioural conditions, including children who may have FASD. Since 2006, thousands of children and their families have accessed services provided by 52 contracted agencies.

The Provincial Health Services Authority provides Indigenous Cultural Competency training to regional health authorities, the Ministry of Health, and the First Nations Health Authority. To date, more than 11,000 employees have completed the training.
Justice

In March 2015, the Province provided over $1 million in civil forfeiture grant funding to support 58 projects that focus Aboriginal anti-violence and prevention initiatives.

The B.C. government provides more than $660,000 in annual funding for Aboriginal-specific victim service and violence against women programs in B.C.

The Ministry of Children and Family Development has implemented a number of initiatives, including:
Cultural awareness training for youth custody and community youth justice staff.

Specialized Aboriginal programs are available in both youth custody centres in the province (Prince George and Burnaby).

Alternatives to custody for Aboriginal youth such as a community-based full-time attendance program for Aboriginal girls with substance use issues.

Restructuring community-based custody alternatives like full-time attendance programs and bail beds to ensure they are addressing the needs of Aboriginal youth and that all programs are trauma-informed and culturally responsive.

Through the federal Aboriginal Justice Strategy, the Ministry of Children and Family Development partners with Justice Canada and the B.C. Ministry of Justice to support culturally relevant community-based alternatives and/or supports to the formal justice system (e.g., diversion, restorative justice, crime prevention/early intervention, circle sentencing, court liaison).

Since 1997, mediation has been used as a proven mechanism to work through child protection matters. Today, nearly one-third of the 61 child protection mediators in the program are self-identified as Aboriginal and many others have close connections to Aboriginal communities.
B.C.’s Limitation Act provides no limitation period for claims of historical sexual abuse.
Missing Children and Burial Information

On March 28, 2014, through a Truth and Reconciliation Commission national event, the Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation provided British Columbia’s data on the deaths of Aboriginal children between the ages of four and 19 years of age for the period of 1870 - 1984. This was an important step in recognizing the scale of loss and suffering that occurred in the Canadian Indian Residential School system. The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations protects burial sites under section 13 of the Heritage Conservation Act.

Thursday, June 18, 2015

CRD urges partial re-start of Mt Polley Mine

Courtesy of the Cariboo Regional District:

The Cariboo Regional District has expressed its support for the restricted restart of the Mount Polley Mine to the Minister of Energy and Mines, The Honourable Bill Bennett and the Minister of Environment, The Honourable Mary Polak.

The CRD has also requested the government to include the Cariboo Regional District and the community of Likely in future discussions regarding the mine and its operations, to share the Emergency Response Plan with First Nations, the Cariboo Regional District, and the community of Likely; and to maintain and expand the role of the Public Liaison Committee to truly gather input from the community.

The Cariboo Regional District Board has been receiving regular updates from the provincial ministries on the restart application and has been provided with the submissions made to government during the public consultation process.

A decision on the restricted restart of Mount Polley is expected to be rendered by the Province by mid-July 2015

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

CC Joint Committee Mtg - June 17th

Present from CRD - Directors S. Forseth, B. Kemp, J. Sorley

Present from City of WL - Mayor W. Cobb; Councillors S. Nelson, J. Ryll, L. Walters and S. Zacharias (via teleconference)

Meeting chaired by Mayor W. Cobb

Meeting called to order at 5pm


Meeting agenda approved/May 27th CC Joint Committee meeting minutes adopted

Delegation:

1) Kevin Klipperstien, Victor Davis Architects & Lewis Reilly and John Bowser, Tango Management appeared before the Committee to discuss the Sam Ketchum Pool Upgrade Project

A Question/Answer period ensued

The Chair, on behalf of the Committee, thanked the delegation for their time/information

Business:

1) Pool Upgrade Project - Working Group Meeting Notes - June 17, 2015

The Mgr of Community Services (CRD) discussed this item with the Committee
Discussion ensued thereon

Resolved - Report of the Mgr of Community Services be received

2) Cost for Accessibility Analysis in Cariboo Memorial Recreation Complex

The Director of Community Services (City of WL) discussed this item with the Committee
Discussion ensued thereon

Resolved - That this report be deferred to the September Joint Committee Meeting.  Approved by the following vote:

Affirmative - Mayor Cobb; Councillors Nelson and Walters; Directors Sorley, Kemp and Forseth

Negative - Councillor J. Ryll

3) Joint Use Agreement Committee

The Director of Community Services (City of WL) discussed his report with the Committee
Discussion ensued thereon

Resolved - That Director Steve Forseth with Director Sorley as Alternate; Councillor Jason Ryll with Councillor Laurie Walters as Alternate and the Director of Community Services and the Mgr of Community Services be appointed to the Joint Use Committee

4) 2014 CCACS Annual Report

Discussion ensued

Resolved - Report be received

5) Action Page

Discussion ensued

Resolved - That the Action Page be received and Items #7,8,10,11 be removed from the Action Page

Meeting adjourned at 5:37pm

CC Rural Caucus Mtg - June 17th

Present - Chair S. Forseth; Directors B. Kemp, J. Sorley and B. Anderson

Meeting called to order at 3:06pm

Agenda approved and CC Rural Caucus Mins of May 20th meeting approved

Delegation:

1) Elcy Lepage from Interior Roads appeared before the Committee to discuss their Summer Road Program

A Question/Answer period ensued

The Chair, on behalf of Rural Caucus, thanked Ms. LePage for her time/information

Business:

1) The Committee discussed the following:

a) Presentation from the CRD Mgr of Community Services re: BC Transit Services Review
b) Electoral Area Directors' Forum at the 2015 UBCM Convention

Meeting adjourned at 3:49pm

Future of Wildwood Elementary Mtg

At a meeting hosted by School District #27 with the Board of Education and their Senior Staff present -- 25 parents showed up to discuss the future of Wildwood Elementary.  Kiley Sales, Assistant to Cariboo-North MLA Coralee Oakes and Cariboo Regional District Electoral Area 'D' Director Steve Forseth were also present

After opening statements from SD27 Superintendent Mark Thiessen and Board of Education Chair Tanya Guenther, Alex Telford (Mgr of Facilities & Transportation) and Kevin Futchner (Sec-Treasurer) gave an presentation of previous flooding at Wildwood Elementary and the options going forward

After the presentation, a Question/Answer period ensued.  Questions being asked included:

* Why can't you bring in portables for Wildwood Elementary site?

* Questions around the "School of Choice" Program?
* Pursuit of other funding options (non-government) for repairs to Wildwood Elementary?
* Why can't water be diverted via Pacific Rd?
* Removal of Items from Wildwood Elementary?

SD27 Chair Tanya Guenther encouraged the 25 parents present to further present their views via letters or emails to the SD27 Office in addition to making oral submissions at the next Board of Education meeting on Tuesday, June 22nd at 6:30pm

~SF

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Design Consultant for SKP Project Selected

Joint Release of the City of Williams Lake & Cariboo Regional District

The Cariboo Regional District and the City of Williams Lake have selected the Design Consultant Team for the Sam Ketcham Pool (SKP) Upgrade project at the West Fraser Aquatic Centre. The successful firm is Vic Davies Architecture from Victoria, B.C.

A total of six responses to the Design Consultant Request for Proposals were received and the SKP project working group conducted on-site tours and interviews with four short-listed candidates. Vic Davies Architecture was the most experienced firm and design team having completed forty 25-metre lap/competition pools, and 15 combined lap and leisure facilities for a total of 40 aquatic centres. The firm is considered an innovation leader in aquatic design; the first to design a leisure pool in Canada (Maple Ridge); first to incorporate a wave pool in British Columbia (Langley) and the first indoor accessible waterslide in North America (North Saanich).

“The Sam Ketcham Pool Working Group and our project management firm were pleased with the quality of the submissions we received for the renovations and upgrade design,” stated CRD Electoral Area F Director Joan Sorley. “Their extensive experience shows their ability to deliver exemplary designs on budget and on time.”

“The selection of the Design Consultant Team is another exciting step forward for this project,” said Williams Lake City Councillor Laurie Walters. “I can’t wait to see the results of the next design phase.”

The full project team including Vic Davies Architecture and Tango Project Management will be attending the next Central Cariboo Joint Committee meeting taking place June 17 at City Hall (450 Mart Street) in Council Chambers at 5 p.m. to introduce themselves to the community and elected officials. All residents are welcome to attend.

The Sam Ketcham Pool, located in the West Fraser Aquatic Centre at the Cariboo Memorial Recreation Complex will undergo an extensive renovation upgrade over the next two years. The next step in the project will focus on development of detailed designs. The initial schematic design phase is scheduled to be complete by late July and will conclude with a presentation to the joint committee and open house for the public to review and comment on the proposed design.

A Facebook page dedicated to helping provide information to residents and an opportunity for residents to ask questions can be found at facebook.com/SamKetchamPool. A Twitter feed can also be found at @SKPProject. Project updates will also be posted on the Cariboo Regional District website at cariboord.ca and on the City of Williams Lake site at williamslake.ca.

New ALR Regulations to encourage farming

Courtesy of the BC Government:

New regulations under the Agricultural Land Commission Act will encourage farming and help B.C.’s agricultural community fill the growing demand for B.C. food, locally and around the world, Agriculture Minister Norm Letnick announced today.

The regulations will help farmers throughout B.C. take advantage of the demand for value-added B.C. goods by promoting the use of co-operatively owned processing facilities. The changes make it easier, for example, for berry growers to use co-operatively owned facilities to make value added products like jams or sauces, or flash freeze them for off-season sales.

Similarly, the regulation creates opportunities for producers in the north and east to pool resources and establish value-added facilities for fruits, grains, honey and other crops. The opportunity for B.C. farmers to increase their income through value-added products also encourages farmers to expand their business models and consider growing additional crops in the ALR.

The regulations also support the growing appreciation of B.C. wines, beers and spirits by locals, as well as those visiting B.C. Breweries, distilleries and meaderies will be permitted to operate on ALR land on terms similar to wineries, requiring at least 50% of the products used to make the beverage be grown on the farm. Another change, subject to the results of consultations being conducted by the Liquor Control and Licensing Branch, will permit alcohol producers in the ALR to offer alcohol from other producers to their lounge and restaurant guests, so winery guests who prefer a beer with their meal can have one.

Government is consulting on this, with plans to open up the opportunity to manufacturers later this year, so that any winery, brewery, cidery, distillery or meadery can sell products made off-site in their lounges - aligning with a recommendation made in the B.C. Liquor Policy Review. The change will create more opportunities for B.C. farmers to grow and produce crops used for these beverages, as well as building on British Columbia’s growing international reputation for culinary tourism.

In 2014, two ALC-administered zones were created to better recognize the province’s regional differences. Zone 2 includes the Interior, Kootenay and North regions, where growing seasons are shorter than elsewhere in the province. One other change in the regulation supports succession planning in Zone 2, by allowing retiring farmers to continue living on their family farm after they’ve sold it using a lease for a life term. The retiring farmers can continue to live on the farm they have worked on, while sharing their knowledge with the next generation of farmers who have purchased their farm, and keeping the entire piece of land in production, growing crops and food.

The Regulations are one part of the B.C. government’s efforts to grow the Agrifood Sector to $14 billion by 2017, by supporting high-quality, high value products, building domestic and international markets and securing a strong future for farming.

BC's Agriculture Minister Nick Letnick said:

“We heard in our extensive consultations with representatives of about 100 farming groups and local governments, that British Columbians wanted these regulations to help preserve farmland and encourage agriculture, and that’s what we’ve delivered. These regulations provide farming families the chance to earn a higher income, and prepare for the transition of the farm from one generation to another, ensuring B.C. has a growing agrifoods economy and reliable food source for years to come.”

New ALR Regulations:

The new regulations, applicable in both Zones 1 and 2, are intended to:

Encourage farming by allowing landowners to lease portions of their land for agricultural production without an application to the ALC.

Support value-added farming by updating a regulation that requires farms in the ALR with on-site packing and processing facilities to grow at least 50% of the farm products packed or processed. The update allows facilities owned by co-operative associations to count all produce provided by their members as part of the 50%. This change encourages farming operations to pool resources and establish a single co-operative processing facility, rather than building individual facilities on multiple farms. Individual farmers with a facility at one location are also able to include crops they produce on other parcels of land they own or lease, as part of the 50% calculation.

Encourage value-added farming by allowing breweries, distilleries and meaderies on ALR land on terms similar to wineries, requiring at least 50% of the farm products used to make the beer, spirits, and mead be grown on the farm.

Expand opportunities for additional revenue for farmers by allowing wineries, cideries, breweries, distilleries and meaderies in the ALR to sell alcohol that was not produced on the farm in their lounges and restaurants, subject to the Liquor Control and Licensing Act and local government regulations. Retail sales of products will remain restricted to those produced on the farm.

In addition, succession planning in Zone 2 is being supported by allowing:

Retiring farmers who sell their property to continue living on their family farm using a lease for a life term. The retiring farmer may sell their farmland and lease back their family farm residence from the person who purchased the farm. The lease terminates when the retiree dies or leaves the property. To take advantage of this lease option, the farmer must have owned and operated the farm for at least 15 years; the farm must be at least five hectares in size; and the portion of the land that is leased back to the retiring farmer must be no larger than one hectare.

Owners of larger ALR parcels (50 hectares and over), to build a second single family dwelling for family or rental income purposes, providing the total area used for residential purposes on the parcel of land is less than 4,000 m2 (43,000 sq. ft.) or 0.4 of a hectare. The area used for residential purposes includes the total area occupied by all residences and residential facilities, roads and service lines, and all land between them.

The changes follow and were guided by extensive consultations with representatives of about 100 farming groups and local governments as well as the hundreds of individual farmers and citizens who contributed their thoughts and ideas. A summary of the consultation process and results is available at: http://www2.gov.bc.ca/govtogetherbc/consultations/ALC_regulations.page

Thursday, June 11, 2015

COW Mtg (CRD Board) - June 11th

Present:

Chair Richmond; Directors Armstrong, Bruce, Massier, Forseth, Kemp, Sorley, Wagner, Cash, Anderson, Coakley, Sharpe, Cobb and Campsall

Absent: 

Directors R. William (Area J) and B. Simpson (Quesnel)

Meeting called to order at 11am

Agenda was approved

Delegation – 11am

Members from the Interlakes Economic Association appeared before the Committee to discuss governance in the Interlakes area

A Question/Answer period ensued

The Chair, on behalf of the Committee, thanked the delegation for their time/information

Business:

The Committee made the following decisions:

1) The Committee received a memo from the Mgr of Development Services regarding providing hard copy documents when soliciting public input

Meeting recessed at 12:08pm
Meeting resumed at 12:53pm

2) The Committee received a memo from the Mgr of Development Services regarding notification distances for planning applications and the Committee agreed to recommend to the CRD Board that Staff be directed to bring forward an amended bylaw to increase the notification distance to 100 m for Development Variance Permits

3) The Committee received a memo from the Mgr of Development Services in regards to ancillary buildings and structures and the Committee agreed to recommend to the CRD Board that Staff be directed to bring draft amendment bylaws to the Board

4) The Committee received a memo from secondary suites and/or carriage houses and the Committee agreed to recommend to the CRD Board that Staff be directed to bring draft amendment bylaws to the Board

5) The Committee received a memo from the Mgr of Financial Services concerning the allocation of Community Works Funds and directed Staff to provide the Board with a breakdown of spent Community Works Funding by sub-region

6) The Committee received a memo of the CAO concerning a customized Oath of Office and the Committee agreed to retain the current Oath of Office

7) The Committee received a memo of the CAO concerning referred Item 1.1 from the Level 1 Corporate Priorities Report and requested more information on a economic development proposal from UNBC

8) The Committee received a memo of the CAO concerning Budget Consultation Meetings and that they be discontinued and that the annual provisional budget be placed at offices in Quesnel, Williams Lake and 100 Mile House plus CRD Libraries .  Approved by the following vote:

Affirmative - Chair Richmond; Directors Armstrong, Bruce, Massier, Forseth, Kemp, Sorley, Wagner, Anderson, Coakley, and Sharpe

Negative - Directors D. Cash (Area I) and M. Campsall (100 Mile House)

9) The Committee received a memo of the CAO concerning Town Hall meetings and Staff report back on a Committee Engagement process

Meeting recessed at 3:09pm
Meeting resumed at 3:17pm

Delegation – 3:17pm:

David Morel, Assistant Deputy Minister, Ministry of Energy and Mines appeared before the Committee, via teleconference, to brief the Committee on the ongoing re-start application for Mt Polley

A Question/Answer period ensued

The Chair, on behalf of the Committee, thanked Mr. Morel for his time/information

Business, cont:

The Committee at 3:48pm convened an In-Camera Meeting as per Section 90(1f and 1k – law enforcement and negotations) of the Community Charter and resumed its’ public meeting at 4:49pm

The Committee adjourned its’ meeting at 4:50pm

CRD Policy Committee Mtg - June 11th

Present: 

Chair J. Massier; Directors J. Bruce, S. Forseth and J. Sorley

Meeting called to order at 9:07am

Business:


1) The Committee received a memo from the Corporate Officer concerning Policy No. 02-10B-5(1) [First Nations Correspondence] and agreed to recommend to the CRD Board that it be deleted from the Policy Manual

2) The Committee received a memo from the Corporate Officer concerning Public Notification and/or Consultation for Regulatory Bylaws Policy and agreed to recommend to the CRD Board that the policy be deleted from the Policy Manual

The Committee commenced an in-depth review of the Policy Manual

The Committee adjourned at 10:40am

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

100 Mile House recognized for its commitment to seniors

Courtesy of the BC Government Caucus:

The District of 100 Mile House has been awarded an Age-friendly BC Recognition designation from the provincial government for its support of seniors to remains safe, active and independent.

“I would like to offer my thanks to Councillor Ralph Fossum and Lea Smirfitt of the community planning council for the work they do serving and making a positive difference for seniors in our community,” said Cariboo-Chilcotin MLA Donna Barnett. “As B.C.’s population ages, it’s vital to plan and make priorities in order to accommodate the arrival of older people. 100 Mile House is focused on the future and fully deserve being granted their Age-friendly BC Recognition designation.”

100 Mile House has received its Age-friendly BC Recognition is in part due to the District conducted a community assessment and planning process, which included focus groups, a community café, and a survey. The results identified communication, transportation, housing, and advocacy as age-friendly priorities.

100 Mile House is one of 11 B.C. communities being recognized this week and will receive a letter of congratulations, an Age-friendly BC Recognition award poster, along with $1,000 to create a legacy project or a celebration.

The Age-friendly BC Recognition program is a partnership between the BC Healthy Communities Society and the Ministry of Health and is part of the Age-friendly BC strategy. To date, 36 B.C. communities have received Age-friendly BC Recognition.

To achieve recognition, four key steps must be taken. These include establishing an age-friendly advisory or steering committee, passing a council or district board resolution, conducting an age-friendly assessment, and developing and publishing an action plan.

100 Mile House and the other 10 recognized communities will continue implementing age-friendly plans and projects.

For a complete list of age-friendly recognized communities and to learn more about how communities can receive age-friendly recognition, please visit:

www.gov.bc.ca/agefriendly/recognition

The recognized communities will continue implementing age-friendly plans and projects.

BC Summer Reading Club Returns to CRD Libraries

Courtesy of the Cariboo Regional District:

The Cariboo Regional District Libraries in 100 Mile House, Quesnel, and Williams Lake invite children of all ages to join this year’s BC Summer Reading Club: Build It! The program starts in July and registration is free.

Once registered, members will receive a special kit to keep track of their reading over the summer months. If they achieve their summer reading goal, they will be awarded a collectible medal.

Children can sign up to attend one free session per week. Each week they will be participating in a variety of fun activities, crafts, and story-times based on the theme Build it. Weekly themes include Build the Future, Build your Story, Build it Yourself and more!

The program is designed to motivate children to read regularly (or be read to), to help maintain or improve reading skills while school is out. It makes reading fun by inviting kids to read what they want. The Cariboo Regional District Library staff can help children find suitable materials, whether it’s a print book, audiobook, e-book, magazine or any combination of items. The Summer Reading Club will conclude with a celebration party for all participants.

Contact your local Summer Reading Club Program Coordinator for further details or visit us online at cln.ca for all current library service program offerings.

100 Mile House – Registration opens June 16th
Email: ohsrcoordinator@cariboord.ca
Telephone: 250-395-2332

Quesnel– Registration opens June 23rd
Email: qsrcoordinator@cariboord.ca
Telephone: 250-992-7912

Williams Lake – Registration opens June 10th
Email: wlsrcoordinator@cariboord.ca
Telephone: 250-392-3630

The BC Summer Reading Club reaches more than 85,000 BC children every year. The program is sponsored by the British Columbia Library Association, with financial support from the Libraries Branch of the Ministry of Education, and the RBC Foundation.

Telehealth technology available for Family Doctors

Courtesy of the Central Interior Rural Division of Family Practice:

Long distances and challenging driving conditions can make it difficult for some patients in the Cariboo-Chilcotin region to get to their doctor’s office, so a group of physicians in the region is turning to telemedicine to ensure that their patients have consistent access to a primary care provider. The Central Interior Rural Division of Family Practice and the First Nations Health Authority are working together to introduce telehealth technology making it easier for some family physicians to provide ongoing care to their patients in rural and First Nations communities.

“We know that having a primary care provider can mean better health for individuals, as well as communities,” said Health Minister Terry Lake. “And tailoring community solutions for greater accessibility to primary care especially in rural and remote locations, like the Division has done in the Cariboo-Chilcotin, strengthens our health care system as a whole.”

Telemedicine is just one of the strategies being implemented by the Central Interior Rural Division of Family Practice as part of A GP for Me. A GP for Me is a joint initiative of the Government of BC and Doctors of BC that aims to improve access to primary care across the province and help more British Columbians who want a primary care provider to find one.

“The results of a community assessment in 2014 showed that patients who are particularly vulnerable – First Nations, people with mental health challenges, and the frail elderly – are having a difficult time getting access to quality primary care,” says Dr. Bruce Nicolson, Physician Lead for the A GP for Me initiative. “We really listened to what our community members, stakeholders, physicians and health-care providers had to say and we believe our resulting programs will strengthen primary care services.”

The division’s strategies, which are being introduced this spring include:

• Improved access to primary care through Telehealth services in the Cariboo-Chilcotin, developed in partnership with the First Nations Health Authority will start with a group of six doctors using telemedicine technology to provide care to patients in rural First Nations communities. This strategy also sees the Provincial Health Services Authority and Interior Health working with family doctors to increase awareness of First Nations culture through Indigenous Cultural Competency Training.

• A program designed to help doctors keep up to date with the latest office technologies, as well as increase their awareness and knowledge of new models of health care, including
team-based care which encourages a more community-based approach to care, will help support patients while making the best use of existing capacity and services.

• A coordinator will work with key partners to help find locums and work towards ensuring patients are taken care of when a doctor takes time off or retires, and to attract new doctors to the area.

“Many of our residents live in rural or First Nations communities,” said Dr Glenn Fedor, Chair of the CIRD. “This presents unique challenges but we feel that using the latest technology, and partnering with other health and community service organizations will allow us to make a significant improvement in the level and quality of care.

City of WL 2014 Annual Report available

Courtesy of the City of Williams Lake:

City of Williams Lake Council will consider the 2014 Annual Report at the Regular Meeting of Council to be held Tuesday, June 23, 2015 at 6:00 pm in Council Chambers, City Hall, 450 Mart Street.

Members of the public are invited to attend the meeting and to present submissions or ask questions with respect to the report.

Copies of the Annual Report will be available for inspection at City Hall, 450 Mart Street on June 9th, or can be downloaded from the City’s web site at www.williamslake.ca in pdf format. Copies of the report will also be available at the June 23rd meeting.

For further information, please call Cindy Bouchard, Manager of Legislative Services at (250) 392-1773 or email cbouchard@williamslake.ca

The direct link to the 2014 Annual Report is here

Tuesday, June 9, 2015

Spruce budworm spraying planned for Cariboo Region

Courtesy of the BC Government:

The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations plans to aerially treat about 16,000 hectares of forest in the Williams Lake Timber Supply Area and the 100 Mile House Timber Supply Area to reduce western spruce budworm populations.

The biological agent Foray 48B will be applied by two fixed-wing aircraft (AT-802 Air Tractors) on or about June 13 to July 3, 2015, weather permitting, on sites near:

Meldrum Creek and Buckskin Lake (west of Williams Lake)
114 Mile House
70 Mile House
Lac La Hache
Loon Creek (east of Clinton)

The western spruce budworm is an insect that is native to B.C. and the Pacific Northwest. In its larval stage, it defoliates Douglas-fir, true firs, spruce and larch trees. A budworm outbreak has the potential to seriously harm or kill trees over large areas.

The pest management plan and maps of the proposed treatment areas can be viewed at the Cariboo Region Forest Health Program office in Williams Lake (640 Borland St., Suite 300) or at the ministry’s Thompson Okanagan Region office in Kamloops (411 Columbia St.).

The maps of the proposed treatment areas in the Cariboo are also available online:

https://www.for.gov.bc.ca/rsi/ForestHealth/Western_Spruce_Budworm_Spray_2015.htm

The 2013-17 pest management plan for the Southern Interior is also available online:

https://www.for.gov.bc.ca/rsi/ForestHealth/index.htm

Foray 48B is a biological insecticide that is widely used in British Columbia and is registered with the Organic Materials Review Institute. The active ingredient in Foray 48B is the naturally occurring bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki (Btk).

This spray only affects moth and butterfly larvae and can be used safely around humans and other animals. Birds, household pets, fish and beneficial insects (including honey bees) are not affected.